Community / Economic Development

Can cities be at the forefront of tackling climate change? According to forthcoming research by Arup and the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group, cities play a crucial role in addressing this pressing issue.
19 hours ago   Doggerel
Kiplinger's picks its 2009 Best Cities list, and in this tough economy decides to put the emphasis on job creation and stability. Number one? Huntsville, Alabama.
Jun 1, 2009   Kiplinger's
Cities across the country are reconsidering tax abatement plans, in the new belief that cities just can't afford them.
May 31, 2009   Next American City
The American Academy of Pediatrics has released a new report focusing on the effect of the built environment on children's health. Access to parks, the ability to walk to school, and opportunities for 'incidental exercise.'
May 30, 2009   American Academy of Pediatrics
A team of visiting planners suggested that Detroit could evolve into a series of urban villages connected by countryside.
May 30, 2009   Detroit Free Press
Alamo Heights, a suburb of San Antonio, grapples with whether to adopt a "New Urbanist" (but slightly more traditional) approach to its major thoroughfare to improve pedestrian and bicycle access.
May 29, 2009   San Antonio Express-News
Small towns like Mesa, WA and larger ones like Vallejo, CA may be forced to dissolve in light of their worsening finances. Local counties will need to absorb residents.
May 28, 2009   The Wall St. Journal
Time Magazine looks at the problem of 'food deserts' in America- usually low-income communities that groceries have spurned, leaving only fast food and bodegas to fill the bill.
May 28, 2009   Time
Herve Kemp believes that the future of employment in Europe will include a million "family farmer jobs."
May 28, 2009   Truthout
Only 17% of shoppers in downtown San Francisco drove to get there, according to a new survey conducted by The San Francisco County Transportation Authority.
May 27, 2009   Streetsblog SF
A friend introduced me yesterday to rambunctious bicycling advocate Fred Oswald via a recent article out of Cleveland’s press. Much debate swirls around his not-so-uncommon opinions. Mr. Oswald’s argument can be boiled down to two points: supporting a critical need for much more bicycling education on sharing public roadways with other vehicles, and fighting an industry-borne fallacy that breaking up streets with allocated spaces, such as bike lanes, is good for the biking community. The former is, of course, not contestable. Blog Post
May 27, 2009   By Ian Sacs