Todd Litman's picture
Blogger
Todd Litman is the executive director of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute.
Member for
 14 years
Contributed
 319 posts
Todd Litman is founder and executive director of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute, an independent research organization dedicated to developing innovative solutions to transport problems. His work helps to expand the range of impacts and options considered in transportation decision-making, improve evaluation methods, and make specialized technical concepts accessible to a larger audience. His research is used worldwide in transport planning and policy analysis.

Mr. Litman has worked on numerous studies that evaluate transportation costs, benefits and innovations. He authored the Online TDM Encyclopedia, a comprehensive Internet resource for identifying and evaluating mobility management strategies; Transportation Cost and Benefit Analysis: Techniques, Estimates and Implications, a comprehensive study which provides cost and benefit information in an easy-to-apply format; and Parking Management Best Practices, the most comprehensive book available on management solutions to parking problems. Mr. Litman is a frequent speaker at conferences and workshops. His presentations range from technical and practical to humorous and inspirational. He is active in several professional organizations, including the Institute of Transportation Engineers and the Transportation Research Board (a section of U.S. National Academy of Sciences). He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Board of Transportation Research A, a professional journal.

Recent Posts

Yesterday
The New Zealand Transport Agency’s new report, "Transport Impacts on Wellbeing and Liveability" provides guidance for transportation planning that achieves fairness, neighborliness, respect, community identity, pride, fitness, and health.
Transport Impacts on Wellbeing and Liveability: Literature Summary
3 days ago
The National Association of Realtors' recent Community and Transportation Preference Survey shows that many households prefer living in walkable urban neighborhoods, and those that do have a higher quality of life.
2020 Community and Transportation Preference Survey
5 days ago
The new 15-Minute City App generates maps which show the number of services and activities within a 15 minute walk, and and therefore whether an area can be considered a 15-minute neighborhood.
15-minute City Map
October 16, 2020, 7am PDT
The ITDP's new Pedestrians First tool describes why and how to improve walking conditions, and provides comprehensive analysis of walkability for 1000 cities.
Pedestrians First
July 29, 2020, 9am PDT
While many cities have shown efforts to implement accessible design since the 1990 adoption of the American Disabilities Act, more must be done.
Smart Cities Dive
Blog post
July 28, 2020, 11am PDT
New Zealand’s new national urban development policy prohibits parking minimums and increases allowable building heights near transit stations. This is a watershed moment for the country’s cities and towns.
Todd Litman
July 28, 2020, 6am PDT
Once again, New Zealand shows the way! The national government's new urban development policy will eliminate off-street parking requirements and remove low height-limits near transit stations to encourage more efficient infill development.
Stuff
Blog post
July 8, 2020, 12pm PDT
During the last 120 years, our mobility increased by an order of magnitude, but so did associated costs. Are we better off? Could we do better?
Todd Litman
July 5, 2020, 9am PDT
Induced traffic occurs when new highway capacity speeds up traffic, allowing travelers to drive further, increasing sprawl. A review of major highway project plans finds that most fail to accurately account for induced travel effects.
Transportation Research Record: The Journal of the Transportation Research Board
July 2, 2020, 6am PDT
A new study finds that county density is not significantly related to the infection rate, but higher density counties have significantly lower virus-related mortality rates than those with lower densities, possibly due to superior health care.
Journal Of The American Planning Association