Web 2.0

March 25, 2012, 7am PDT
Is your city looking to engage residents online? The latest generation of tools just might be your savior. Or your demise.
PlaceShakers
March 1, 2012, 9am PST
Sarah Lai Stirland reports on the new bill, that was to be voted on by the City Council on Wednesday, which would codify many of the principles articulated by open government advocates in recent years.
Tech President
Blog post
February 1, 2012, 3pm PST

Lately as I’ve been trying to help students find information for papers and classes, I’ve stumbled across a few new examples of faculty using the web to give others access to visual data from their research.

Ann Forsyth
October 14, 2011, 10am PDT
A recent Pew Research study revealed that 58% of 25-34 year old Americans own smartphones, and communicate with each other, and their city governments in new ways.
American City and Country
December 9, 2010, 7am PST
More tech workers are choosing the city over the suburbs. Now companies themselves are beginning to follow suit, reports Jon Swartz.
USA Today
December 4, 2010, 9am PST
Washington's panoply of hyperlocal news media is filling the holes left by tradition outlets as web 2.0 expands. Since many of the local newspapers have folded, bloggers and other digital media have grown to cover matters at the local level.
Next American City
Blog post
September 16, 2010, 4pm PDT

One of my first posts back in 2007 dealt with planning faculty blogs (see http://www.planetizen.com/node/24748). 

Ann Forsyth
August 12, 2010, 1pm PDT
Urban Omnibus talks with Jennifer Pahlka of Code for America, a group looking to get the youth involved in developing computer programs and applications that help improve urban areas.
Urban Omnibus
July 9, 2010, 1pm PDT
Melissa Lafsky asks if citizen initiative facilities like '311' and 'fixmystreet' should be expanded into an "operating system" for cities.
The Infrastructurist
June 19, 2010, 9am PDT
Eric Fischer uses Flickr geodata to visualize where photos are taken in cities, and by whom. The result is a colorful divide between tourists and locals in a variety of cities around the world.
The Map Room
April 17, 2010, 9am PDT
Why build your own? There are several free web applications out there that help cities interface with their citizens. Christian Madera picks the best.
Next American City
Blog post
March 11, 2010, 2pm PST

Last year I had the opportunity to teach a graduate course on "Web 2.0 for Policy and Planning" at the University of Southern California's School of Policy, Planning & Development.

Although I am co-teaching a different class this year, I have updated my course website with a revised course syllabus and extensive reading list on Web 2.0 and planning, based on what I learned from teaching the course in Spring, 2009.

Chris Steins
January 8, 2010, 7am PST
London is making public more than 200 streams of city data, joining a host of world cities in sharing city-collected data with its citizens.
BBC
Blog post
May 27, 2009, 12pm PDT


I had the opportuntity, at the 2009 national planning conference in Minneapolis, to present (together with my colleague Christian Peralta Madera) ten free web applications that can be used to support planning.

Approximately 350 participants attended the session. Since the presentation, I've received over 100 emails congratulating us on the practical nature of the presentation, and requesting links to the websites we presented. Since our presentation was a hands-on demonstration, this blog entry outlines the ten technologies, and provides links to examples of the technology in practice and resources so you can experiment with the technologies.

Chris Steins
Blog post
January 19, 2009, 12pm PST


What can we as planners learn from president-elect Barak Obama's use of technology?

President-elect Obama has been an early adopter of Web 2.0 technologies both in his campaign and the transition to the White House. It is likely that the Obama administration will continue to use Web 2.0 technologies to both engage the public in determining policies and to make government operations more transparent.

As planners, there are a lot of great tools and techniques that we can use in the planning processes. Here are some of the tools that the Obama team have used that could be used in planning.

Chris Steins
Blog post
October 28, 2008, 6am PDT

Here in New York City, there is an incredibly popular burger stand in Madison Square Park called The Shake Shack. It's one of the touchpoints for Silicon Alley, and a great meet-up spot. The problem is that its usually insanely crowded, with an hour-long line stretching well across the park.

Not to be defeated, Silicon Alley geeks created the Shake Shack Twitter Bot, which serves as a sort of chat room for people to report wait times at the Shake Shack. It's a few dozen lines of code that leverages Web 2.0 technology to make the city smarter, more efficient, and more fun.

Anthony Townsend
July 29, 2008, 8am PDT
<p>With increasing amounts of data collected and held by governments, there's a lot of opportunity to make use of it for the betterment of communities, according to this column from Neal Peirce.</p>
Citiwire
April 11, 2008, 12pm PDT
<p>Hot technologies like blogs, mashups, YouTube, Flickr, and social networking are among the most notable of new Internet technologies that are collectively known as Web 2.0. These technologies offer great possibilities for planners.</p>
Planning Magazine