Faculty Using Web 2.0 to Show Images

<p> <span style="font-family: Times New Roman; font-size: small"> </span> </p> <p style="margin: 0in 0in 0pt" class="MsoNormal"> <span style="font-size: small"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman">Lately as I’ve been trying to help students find information for papers and classes, I’ve stumbled across a few new examples of faculty using the web to give others access to visual data from their research. <br /> </span></span> </p>

February 1, 2012, 3:54 PM PST

By Ann Forsyth



Lately as I've been trying to help students find information
for papers and classes, I've stumbled across a few new examples of faculty
using the web to give others access to visual data from their research.

Blake Gumprecht, a geographer at the University of New
Hampshire, and author of many works on college towns, provides a number of sets
of images of his research sites on Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gumprecht/collections/72157608078951042/.
He also has a nicely arranged group of places:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/gumprecht/collections/72157619155499136/.
Of course you can just search Flickr or Google Images but these kinds of
curated collections are really useful.

Martin Krieger, a planning professor at USC, has a web site
featuring his images from his urban tomographies program:
http://1000eyes.usc.edu/martin/urban/.
It features a slide show of over 100 images plus maps and more. Not sure what
urban tomography is? Go to:
http://tomography.usc.edu/

Not specifically about planning or research, but the best thing I've
found on YouTube lately, is a set of videos on how to study effectively,
featuring Dr. Stephen Chew an expert in the psychology of learning:
http://www.samford.edu/how-to-study/.
Aimed at undergraduates there is much to learn from these videos even for more
mature learners, such as those involved in continuing education. (I was put
onto the set by a blog post at the Chronicle of Higher Education:
http://chronicle.com/article/MetacognitionStudent/130327/--it may need a subscription).

I'm the director of
the undergraduate urban studies program at Cornell so in coming months I'm
going to be blogging a bit more about issues of relevance to undergraduates in
planning and related areas. My own image collection is gradually going online at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/designforhealth/



Ann Forsyth

Trained in planning and architecture, Ann Forsyth is a professor of urban planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. From 2007-2012 she was a professor of city and regional planning at Cornell.

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