AP Style Guide Favors 'Crash' Over 'Accident' (Sometimes)

This is the moment a lot of traffic safety advocates have been waiting for: the AP Style Guide, purveyors of rules and regulations to journalists and other, has taken a side in the debate about the word "accident."

Read Time: 1 minute

April 5, 2016, 1:00 PM PDT

By James Brasuell @CasualBrasuell


The Twitter account of the AP Stylebook recently released a proclamation that has been a long time in the works for some transportation safety accident.

The retweets and mentions inspired by these tweets are also recommended reading for evidence of the passions and opinions that preceded the momentous announcement. It is important to note that the recommendation falls short of a full prescription to use the words "crash" or "collision" rather than "accident"—and it remains to be seen how many occasions will actually fit the description presented here by the AP Stylebook.

For more on debate on Twitter, see also #CrashNotAccident.

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