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Psychogeographical Markup Language

This time I didn't make it up. From the strange, inventive, and apparently European Web site socialfiction.org comes Psychogeographical Markup Language, a way to tag urban environments with metadata that's not cartographic but emotional. They say, "PML incorporates work done in fields like annotated space, geo-tagging, mental mapping, GIS & collaborative mapping but is different in that it aims at the invisible & the absurd."

As socialfiction's explanation

Bridging Form and Function

David Sucher argues that France's spectacular new bridge is not just a feat of engineering -- it's architecture.

"...I'd suggest that it qualifies as architecture, maybe even top-notch architecture..."


Brian Micklethwait wonders about the reason for building the bridge:

"Economically it looks crazy to me. A few more curves on the road and they could surely have saved themselves billions."

Cities, EV-DO, WiMAX and Wireless?

Walt writes (subscription required, unfortunately) in the Wall Street Journal:

"The most important development this year in U.S. wireless communications wasn't the headline-grabbing mergers of various wireless carriers. It was the quiet, gradual rollout by Verizon Wireless of a technology called EV-DO, which for the first time is providing broadband-speed Internet access over the air from anywhere in the cities where it has been deployed."

Neither City Mouse nor Country Mouse

Hey, look, it's another way to look at city/non-city living! It's from the New York Times Magazine's Year in Ideas issue (reg. req'd). Here it is: your moment of geographic zen.

Micropolises

What does it say about you if you live in a dark green region? Um...that you shop at WalMart? That you have satellite TV? That you're more likely to drive a truck?

I've read the Times article and I still don't really get it.

Discovering Liferay

Liferay thumbI just discovered Liferay, an open source portal, after reading David Fletcher's discussion of Portal Architectures on his blog.

Although I have seen and evaluated PHP Website", I haven't seen see Liferay, which is equally -- perhaps more -- impressive.

'Computer of The Future' Photo Is A Hoax

According to Urban Legends References Pages, the widely circulated 1954 photograph of what a home computer in 2004 would look like is an Internet hoax. The website provides details:

Although the photograph displayed could represent what some people in the early 1950s contemplated a "home computer" might look like (based on the technology of the day), it isn't, as the accompanying text claims, a RAND Corporation illustration from 1954 of a prototype "home computer." The picture is actually an entry submitted to an image modification competition, taken from an original photo of a submarine maneuvering room console found on U.S. Navy web site, converted to grayscale, and modified to replace a modern display panel and TV screen with pictures of a decades-old teletype/printer and television (as well as to add the gray-suited man to the left-hand side of the photo).

The Santa Fe Trail

Albuquerque, NM -- I've been in Santa Fe, 60 miles north of the airport from which I'm now writing, for the past three days. Was attending a conference put on by a CIA think tank, and even though I'm a reporter I think it's pretty badass that I'm actually not allowed to tell you anything about the conference. Nyah nyah.

But Santa Fe put me in mind of a book on my shelf that I haven't read yet, The Tourist City.

More wireless believers

From the Philadelphia Inquirer

"Dream isn't deleted yet. What happens when you take Mayor Street's trailblazing vision of Philadelphia as one huge wireless Internet hot spot and suddenly cool it to the temperature of long-dead star? The vision dies, and with it a shining chance to showcase the city as hip and technology-friendly.
Also shot would be the chance to redefine the "City of Brotherly Love" as a community that reaches across the digital computer divide. The vision doesn't die, though, if enough people start chanting - Neverland-style - that they believe... they believe... they believe."

Planning For Your Home Computer of the Future

Planning 50 years out is never easy -- in planning -- or in technology.

Thanks to Peter Gordon and Dowell Myers for the picture.

Computer of the Future.

Top Word For 2004: 'Blog'

Merriam-Webster Inc. announced that the word "blog" was the "most looked-up word" [CNN] this year. The word will be a new entry in the next edition of the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary.

A four-letter term that came to symbolize the difference between old and new media during this year's presidential campaign tops U.S. dictionary publisher Merriam-Webster's list of the 10 words of the year.

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