Ray LaHood

From Republican congressman from Ill. to President Obama's first Transportation Secretary, Ray LaHood now takes on a new role as a co-chair of the bipartisan coalition, Building America's Future, to advocate for increased infrastructure investment.
Jan 15, 2014   AASHTO Journal
Freed from the political constraints of holding a cabinet position, former Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood told a university audience that the increase is necessary to meet multi-modal infrastructure needs, not just road construction.
Oct 24, 2013   WAMU
News broke Sunday that Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx will be President Obama's choice to succeed Ray LaHood as transportation secretary. Although he does not have a transportation background, Foxx has been an advocate for mass transit and TOD.
Apr 29, 2013   The Charlotte Observer
Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced his pending resignation today - he will leave when a replacement has been confirmed, thus reversing an earlier, informal announcement he had made during an inauguration party on Jan. 21.
Jan 29, 2013   Politico
Stephen Smith sheds light on the problems of leadership holding back Obama's dream of high-speed rail.
Nov 21, 2012   Bloomberg
Ryan Holeywell looks at the contenders to replace Ray LaHood as Obama's Secretary of Transportation. Although his departure has not been officially announced, LaHood has previously signaled that he would leave after the president's first term.
Nov 17, 2012   Governing
Former Rep. Jim Oberstar (D-MN) and chair of the House Transportation Committee was ousted by Chip Cravaack (R) in 2010, who took his seat on the committee and proceeded to gut Oberstar's goals. Cravaack was ousted by Rick Nolan (D), on Nov. 6.
Nov 8, 2012   Streetsblog Capitol Hill
Was Obama's top transportation achievement his decision to name Ray LaHood as U.S. DOT secretary? That's the argument Tanya Snyder makes in evaluating the President's hits and misses regarding transportation policy.
Nov 4, 2012   Streetsblog D.C.
The speedometer on the Chicago to St. Louis train hit 110 mph - and stayed there for five minutes, but it was enough to elevate the spirits of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood and the other dignitaries on-board. Normal speeds top out at 79 mph.
Oct 22, 2012   The Huffington Post
TIME's senior national correspondent posits that once the first shovel begins digging int the Central Valley, the $68 billion project will be hard to stop, regardless of the fact that no federal funding awaits as long as the GOP controls the House.
Jul 12, 2012   Time
On Friday, the US DOT awarded TIGER 2012 funds to 47 projects totaling $500 million -- far less than the $10.2 billion that was asked for from an astounding 703 applications from all 50 states.
Jun 28, 2012   Transportation Nation