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I once was consigned to a table full of business school students at a land-use conference at UCLA. Trying to be a good sport, I offered the only idea that I'd ever had about business: car insurance charged according to miles driven. I posited that since risk and mileage were more or less correlated, it only made sense that people who drove more and incurred more risk should pay more. My tablemates stared back at me as if I had just issued a rousing recitation of Das Kapital. Blog Post
Apr 23, 2008   By Josh Stephens
Both supporters and opponents of the sprawl status quo often refer to suburbia as “The American Dream.” One sprawl-defending organization even calls itself “The American Dream Coalition”. Sprawl critics use similar language; for example, in 1998, the Sierra Club issued a report titled “Sprawl: The Dark Side of the American Dream.” (www.sierraclub.org/sprawl/report98/) Blog Post
Apr 23, 2008   By Michael Lewyn
 Since its launch, one of the three primary goals of Vancouver's EcoDensity Initiative has been to use density, design and land use to strategically assist with the City's growing challenges around affordability. Over the course of the long public dialogue, we've heard many comments and questions on the relationships between density, supply, type of housing and affordability, and it’s been a very hot topic.   Blog Post
Apr 22, 2008   By Brent Toderian
One of the most influential pieces of contemporary urban theory I've ever read was a short monograph by Richard Norton entitled "Feral Cities", which appeared in the Naval War College Review in 2003. Norton described feral cities thusly: "Imagine a great metropolis covering hundreds of square miles. Blog Post
Apr 22, 2008   By Anthony Townsend
Many viewers may not fully appreciate movies as a visual story-telling medium, but that fact came home to me dramatically the other night while watching “Juno,” the off beat, smart and funny film that just snagged a best screenplay Oscar. The deliberate use of architecture and public spaces, in particular, was quite effective although you probably won’t find these references in plot summaries or synopses. Blog Post
Apr 21, 2008   By Samuel Staley
From public transit to public parks to public space, this past week brought a lot of interesting and innovative ideas in the world of urban planning. Blog Post
Apr 18, 2008   By Nate Berg
Cities are sized-up, measured and analyzed in countless ways. The Economist uses statistics to indicate how New York’s financial sector is faring against its London counterpart. Richard Florida measures the extant of the creative class. Allan Jacobs carefully records intersection densities and Jan Gehl simply counts pedestrians. Some, like Peter Calthorpe, go beyond the city line and take stock of the whole region. Blog Post
Apr 17, 2008   By Mike Lydon
Can any North American city have a meaningful public discussion about sustainability, about its "green-ness" or ecological footprint, without having the challenging but necessary public discussion about the city's density?  Many are still trying to. Many freely trumpet smart growth and sustainability without the tension and trouble that comes with discussing the "d-word" openly, and thus avoid the necessary heavy-lifting. Blog Post
Apr 16, 2008   By Brent Toderian
I’ve been torn lately between two contradictory perspectives on the state of the country as it relates to providing transportation infrastructure and service. Blog Post
Apr 16, 2008   By Steven Polzin
Long before I arrived here, I've been a fan and student of Vancouver city-building.   Blog Post
Apr 9, 2008   By Brent Toderian