Philip Rojc's picture
Philip Rojc is a Contributing Editor at Planetizen. He writes about cities, nature, and human development.
Member for
 3 years
Contributed
 716 posts

Recent Posts

July 11, 2018, 10am PDT
Plans for a sizable eco-friendly development on the site of St. Paul's Twin Cities Assembly Plant have drawn support from many, including the city's young mayor. But density opponents remain unconvinced.
CityLab
July 11, 2018, 7am PDT
An effort is underway to reintroduce a natural habitats along a stretch of postindustrial Chicago River canal-scape. Floating garden modules are being used to attract species back to the area.
The Chicago Tribune
July 10, 2018, 12pm PDT
Quarters can be cramped for growing families in Philadelphia's many two-story rowhouses. Rather than decamp to the suburbs, more and more homeowners are simply adding a third story, known as an "overbuild."
Philadelphia Inquirer - Philly.com
July 8, 2018, 5am PDT
Examples like Elon Musk's subway plan in Chicago, app-driven electric scooters littering sidewalks, and Amazon's general preponderance may point to a tech-dominated urban future. But are localities ceding too much power to the private sector?
The New York Times
July 7, 2018, 1pm PDT
Under the new guidelines, developers will need to implement specific community engagement strategies, at times based on a neighborhood's demographics.
The Urbanist
July 7, 2018, 7am PDT
Regional planners and Dallas officials aren't confident that the area's highway-centric worldview (and budget) will change anytime soon. The city's competitiveness in the national job market may be on the line.
D Magazine
June 30, 2018, 1pm PDT
Georgia politics haven't usually been friendly to renewable energy. But some unlikely alliances, and a healthy dose of economics, can go a long way.
Inside Climate News
June 29, 2018, 12pm PDT
Due in part to a parking shortage, Atlanta firms are doling out higher rents to get closer to MARTA stations.
Bisnow
June 19, 2018, 2pm PDT
A pair of interactive maps and a report compare access to opportunity in two very different neighborhoods. In both places, residents confront "friction of distance" and feel their input on public decision-making is limited.
Next City
June 19, 2018, 1pm PDT
There's a lot to like about the resurgence of downtown cores. But as is the case elsewhere, Denver's core has only attracted a small subset of the wider city's population. Most people still call the suburbs home.
The Denver Post