Philip Rojc's picture
Philip Rojc is a Contributing Editor at Planetizen. He writes about cities, nature, and human development.
Member for
 3 years
Contributed
 698 posts

Recent Posts

5 days ago
What they lack in speed they make up for in revelry. But multiple-rider "beer bikes" also pose challenges to regulators.
Governing
5 days ago
TransitCenter's Steven Higashide argues that despite all the hype around self-driving vehicles, traditional high-capacity transit still has some distinct advantages. As long, that is, as transit agencies are willing to recognize them.
TransitCenter
May 11, 2018, 9am PDT
Prices remain depressed in most formerly redlined neighborhoods, but several such areas in Denver now boast higher home values than the city as a whole.
The Denver Post
May 11, 2018, 8am PDT
Brookings has put together nine rules for more cohesive and effective housing policy, despite federalism's tendency to create near-infinite local variety.
Brookings
May 4, 2018, 12pm PDT
Sacramento Regional Transit's SmaRT Ride service is an on-demand public option to compete with Uber and Lyft.
The Sacramento Bee
May 4, 2018, 10am PDT
Last year's tax reform bill seriously curtailed the mortgage interest deduction, despite its reputation for untouchability. Perhaps lawmakers should get rid of it entirely.
Slate
May 4, 2018, 6am PDT
Pittsburgh is betting on its own version of New York City's famed elevated park, based on a 500-foot-long raised roadway connecting two warehouses.
The Architect's Newspaper
May 3, 2018, 2pm PDT
Five decades after the Fair Housing Act, racial inequality is still rampant in American cities. Trulia and the National Fair Housing Alliance collaborated on this report on four of them.
Curbed Atlanta
May 1, 2018, 10am PDT
In Seattle, securing every new bike lane seems like a "tooth and nail" fight. But across a border to the north, vigorous initial opposition melted away as a connected system took shape.
The Seattle Times
May 1, 2018, 9am PDT
Where is gentrification most likely to occur in cities like Detroit? And how can that data guide policy? A new report provides some insight.
Forbes