Technology

Mobile phones are doubling for tickets onto airplanes and into concerts all over the world. Why not commuter trains too?
3 days ago   Chicago Tribune
"Participatory Chinatown" is a computer game designed to increase public participation in the planning process in Boston.
May 7, 2010   The Boston Globe
Filmmaker Keiichi Matsuda imagines a future where augmented reality is everywhere, blanketing the built environment with advertising and interactive elements.
May 7, 2010   Vimeo
In the wake of an attempted car bombing in New York City's Times Square, officials are calling for the expanded use of security cameras throughout Manhattan.
May 6, 2010   Agence France Presse
PlaceMatters has partnered with the National Charrette Institute on a number of occasions, providing trainings and giving panel presentations at conferences. One of our common themes is "High Touch, High Tech Charrettes." During the sessions we talk about the advantages of low tech and when it makes sense to bring in high tech. Below I have embedded a video that is a montage of clips filmed during a downtown revitalization Charrette in Wichita Kansas. Opinion
May 4, 2010   By Ken Snyder
Alternative energy cars: will they be our salvation, or will they perpetuate auto-dependency? Jan Lundberg critiques the Sierra Club's longstanding priority on increasing fuel efficiency.
May 2, 2010   Culture Change
<em>GOOD</em> points us to a new project that harnesses the power of citizens to create a census of trees in San Francisco.
May 2, 2010   Good
Broad thinking about the future may mean focusing on smaller, technology-based planning solutions, according to this essay from Regional Plan Association Executive Director Thomas K. Wright.
Apr 30, 2010   Regional Plan Association
This series from the <em>BBC</em> looks at the art and innovation of cartography.
Apr 29, 2010   BBC
Beef by-products, turned into bio-diesel, make up 20% of the fuel being used today by Amtrak's Heartland Flyer between Fort Worth and Oklahoma City.
Apr 28, 2010   Fast Company
I was reading Wendell Cox's recent attack on the Center for Neighborhood Technology's affordability calculations, and was struck by one thing he wrote:"transportation costs will be reduced in the future by the far more fuel efficient vehicles being required by Washington."*  Opinion
Apr 26, 2010   By Michael Lewyn