Social / Demographics

November 3, 2006, 8am PST
<p>Across the country, an increasing number of marathon runners are adding to the economic growth of small, mid-size, and large cities.</p>
The Boston Globe
November 3, 2006, 6am PST
<p>An urban planning professor in Australia has joined a push to make the country's major cities more child-friendly.</p>
The Daily Telegraph
November 2, 2006, 2pm PST
<p>A new study challenges the growing body of research linking suburban living to obesity -- citing that people's eating and exercise habits more likely dictate where they live, not vice versa.</p>
Ottawa Citizen via Canada.com
November 2, 2006, 10am PST
<p>Faced with low unemployment rates and worker shortages in certain high-skill sectors, Irish companies are increasingly looking to other countries - especially the U.S. - for employees.</p>
The Wall Street Journal
November 1, 2006, 2pm PST
<p>With 90,000 residents and growing, Davie, Florida is struggling to move beyond its rural roots.</p>
The Miami Herald
October 31, 2006, 12pm PST
<p>A Canadian architect has been in the Philippines for the past year designing homes for the country's poorest citizens. His method utilizes whatever building materials can be found to create an easily constructed and long-lasting home.</p>
The Globe and Mail
October 31, 2006, 11am PST
<p>Making cities and urban places more child-friendly was the subject of a recent planning conference in Sydney, Australia. Attendees highlighted some of the ways poor planning can negatively affect childhood development.</p>
The Australian
October 30, 2006, 2pm PST
<p>A list of the least and most dangerous cities in the United States as ranked by the research and publishing company Morgan Quitno Press.</p>
FOX News
October 29, 2006, 7am PST
<p>Stakeholders in Arizona are battling it out this election over how to handle more than 9 million acres of state trust land.</p>
Tucson Weekly
October 28, 2006, 11am PDT
<p>Downtown living is an increasingly attractive alternative to suburban living.</p>
New Hampshire Business Review
October 27, 2006, 12pm PDT
<p>America's population recently reached 300 million, and is on a track to increase by another 100 million within 30 to 40 years. Based on the increasing use of resources, many fear that 400 million may be too much to handle.</p>
USA Today
October 27, 2006, 9am PDT
<p>Researchers at the University of Toronto conclude that linking sprawl and obesity is misguided.</p>
University of Toronto, Department of Economics
October 26, 2006, 2pm PDT
<p>An automobile tour through Mumbai (Bombay) reveals the extreme contrasts in India's financial capital.</p>
Urban Tours by Rental Car
Feature
October 23, 2006, 7am PDT
With its emphasis on good food, sustainable living, and local community, the Slow City movement is spreading across Europe. But what potential is there for the movement to make the jump across the Atlantic?
Heike Mayer, Paul L. Knox
October 20, 2006, 9am PDT
<p>Clare Pfeiffer Ramsey interviews real estate guru Chris Leinberger on developing walkable urbanity in Detroit.</p>
Model-D
October 20, 2006, 8am PDT
<p>Policies and initiatives based on class and race are essential in altering the unequal patterns of opportunity in cities and suburbs.</p>
Shelterforce Magazine
October 20, 2006, 7am PDT
<p>Grants, contributions, a collaboration with the Institute for Classical Architecture &amp; Classical America, open minds, and tight budgets are helping Habitat for Humanity raise its design standards.</p>
New Urban News
October 19, 2006, 11am PDT
<p>A new study from the Brookings Institute attempts to locate and describe the exurbs of large metropolitan areas in the United States.</p>
The Brookings Institution
October 19, 2006, 7am PDT
<p>Philip Langdon recalls mixed-feelings about Reston's unfinished dream.</p>
New Urban News
October 19, 2006, 4am PDT
<p>In the largest real estate deal in history, a joint venture between Tishman Speyer and BlackRock Inc.'s real-estate arm secured Peter Cooper Village and Stuyvesant Town, two large apartment communities on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, for $5.4 billion.</p>
The Wall Street Journal