Social / Demographics

The city may grow by 200,000 in the next two years, surpassing Philadelphia and Phoenix, if city leaders agree to annex five surrounding unincorporated areas. The Wall Street Journal considers the effect of annexation on meeting inner city needs.
4 days ago   The Wall Street Journal
Urban runoff and contaminated water are creating major ecological damage, even in the United States. One design competition has the goal of rethinking how we handle this crucial resource.
Sep 14, 2010   Metropolis
Unclean and unsafe water is an increasingly vexing problem for the world's cities, which are struggling to meet the needs of rapidly growing populations. But there has been some positive work in developing countries.
Sep 12, 2010   Citiwire
Many people have argued that global cities can take lessons from informal communities like Dharavi and the favelas of Brazil. Designers Pavlina Ilieva and Kuo Pao Lian have created a new framework for city development based on these informal cities.
Sep 11, 2010   The Futurist
Miami could be the next major American city, and one that other global cities should try to emulate, according to this interview with economist Saskia Sassen.
Sep 10, 2010   Foreign Policy
This post from <em>The Atlantic</em> suggests that mobile devices and the ability to connect them with the Internet will help lure more people into cities.
Sep 10, 2010   The Atlantic
<em>Urban Omnibus</em> talks with Swoon, a Brooklyn-based street artist whose work is intended to engage constructed environments.
Sep 9, 2010   Urban Omnibus
The American Institute of Economic Research ranks the best cities and towns in which to attend college, using academic achievement, quality of life, and professional opportunities as factors.
Sep 8, 2010   USA Today
Mary Newsom questions the current and diminishing lack of public worth in the United States today. " Americans have stopped believing that value is something everyone deserves," she writes.
Sep 6, 2010   Charlotte Observer
It's already disappearing. The temporary city that forms during the annual Burning Man event is fading away, as the tens of thousands of people who traveled out to live in the desert of northwestern Nevada for the past week have filed out of the void and returned back to the rest of the world. The event's organizers and volunteers are still erasing the traces of the event, from demolishing structures to removing fencing to picking up trash. Within another week or so, the entire city will have disappeared. It's an interesting way for a city to exist -- just a few weeks at a time, once a year. But it's been working for Burning Man and Black Rock City, the name of that temporary city that forms and disbands almost as soon as it comes to full life. On top of what's already a unique experiment in citymaking, the theme of this year's event was Metropolis, which spurred the tens of thousands of people and artists who make up the city to think a little more about how their "party in the desert" is actually a little city and community (the fourth largest city in Nevada during its run), and how it relates to their world beyond the desert. Opinion
Sep 6, 2010   By Nate Berg
Pedestrianism is on the rise in Cape Town, South Africa, where the recent World Cup has inspired more citizens to get out of their cars and put their feet on the street.
Sep 4, 2010   The Christian Science Monitor