Social / Demographics

Cities change. The people living in cities change. A new online tool from the Urban Institute allows users to forecast demographic trends as far out at 2030.
10 hours ago   CityLab
In Haiti, displacement camps full of people left without homes after the devastating January earthquake are becoming more and more permanent. Deborah Gans argues that these sites should be more carefully planned to foster functioning places.
Sep 24, 2010   Places
Travel + Leisure magazine confuses suburbs with small cities in a recent article called "Coolest Suburbs Worth a Visit." The New Urban Network shows how they got it wrong.
Sep 22, 2010   New Urban Network
Freshwater resources are running out and being overused -- a global crisis that can be seen in the declining flows of the Colorado River.
Sep 22, 2010   Smithsonian Magazine
A proposed irrigation project near the Incan citadel of Machu Picchu in Peru that would divert water away from small villages has sparked violent protests.
Sep 22, 2010   Guardian
A new museum exhibit in Vermont invites visitors to review various proposals for updating the riverfront in Brattleboro -- and allows them to submit their own ideas.
Sep 22, 2010   Change Observer
Finnish architect Tuomas Toivonen has just released an album of urbanism- and architecture-themed rap songs.
Sep 21, 2010   City Of Sound
Without a word of protest, San Francisco's Rebar Group leads the 5th annual worldwide event which highlights the need for public green space.
Sep 21, 2010   New Urban Network
Cyclists who disobey traffic laws are the No. 1 police complaint among residents of Manhattan's Upper East Side. Could the built environment be the real culprit?
Sep 20, 2010   New Urban Network
Emily Peck counts down the top ten most global cities now that more than half the world's population is urbanized. The 21st century will be dominated by the city, writes Parag Khanna. “The age of nations is over. The new urban age has begun.”
Sep 19, 2010   The Wall Street Journal
For some time researchers have noticed more instances of non-affective psychosis in urban populations than in rural groups. Now the American Medical Association has found "certain elements of city living raise the risk of developing schizophrenia."
Sep 19, 2010   The Atlantic