BRT Blossoms in India

This piece from Places takes a look at a new bus rapid transit system that is growing in the Indian city of Ahmedabad.

"A new addition to the BRT network was recently launched in India. Last year the northwestern city of Ahmedabad opened the first phase of the Janmarg - the People's Way. Though still in its infancy, the system has already attracted favorable attention: early this year the U.S.-based Institute for Transportation & Development Policy awarded Janmarg its Sustainable Transport Award.

Ahmedabad, in the state of Gujarat, is India's seventh largest and fifth richest city; it's become a thriving commercial center - via industries including textiles, pharmaceuticals and construction - and its educational institutions attract a large student population. Currently almost five million residents are spread across 80 square miles; local officials estimate that 10 million will inhabit 450 square miles by 2031. Yet while parts of the city flourish, others continue to struggle with poverty. And like most Indian cities, Ahmedabad is grappling with the challenge of adapting existing infrastructure to increasing traffic."

The system was developed with dedicated lanes and helped to create other pedestrian and bike lanes within the city. Meena Kadri offers a tour of the new system and how it is integrating itself into the community.

Full Story: People's Way: Urban Mobility in Ahmedabad

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