Land Use

Eager for downtown development, Kansas City signed a deal subsidizing Cordish Companies to the tune of $295 million. The rejuvenated district should be self-sustaining. So why is the city still funding Cordish?
33 min ago   Next City
This project offers a new idea about how to make use of dead phone booths.
Oct 25, 2009   Blade Diary
The problems facing urban America can be exemplified by looking at the city of Las Vegas, according to this piece from the Brookings Institution's Mark Muro.
Oct 25, 2009   Citiwire
Planning students from New York-area universities are being integrated into the city's community boards through an innovative new fellowship program.
Oct 24, 2009   The Architect's Newspaper
Commissioners in Miami have voted to replace the city's use-based zoning code with a form-based code, dubbed Miami 21, which had been in the works for years.
Oct 23, 2009   The Miami Herald
Global warming is a problem, says climate scientist Jonathan Foley, but it's not the only one. The other major problem facing the global environment is a pattern of land use for agriculture that is grossly unsustainable.
Oct 23, 2009   Yale Environment 360
After four years of political wrangling, hundreds of public and internal meetings, several revisions, and one determined planning department, consultant team, and Mayor, the City of Miami made urban planning history tonight by adopting the largest known application of a form-based code. In doing so, Miami has catapulted itself to the forefront of those large American cities serious about implementing smart growth.  Blog Post
Oct 22, 2009   By Mike Lydon
California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger has signed a bill that allows developers of a planned football stadium in Southern California to bypass environmental laws and speed up the planning process.
Oct 22, 2009   Los Angeles Times
Without even a hint of sarcasm, the National Park Trust is planning to give an award to Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger for protection of public lands.
Oct 22, 2009   Los Angeles Times
With the emergence of new traditional design patterns among contemporary architects, the standards and rules that have defined historic preservation are becoming obsolete. Steven W. Semes calls on planners and designers to create a new ethic of harmonious intervention into historic settings. Exclusive
Oct 22, 2009  By Steven W. Semes
Japan is running out of places to store the remains of its dead, so what better place than in the city, near transit stations in high-tech, high-rise facilities?
Oct 21, 2009   BBC News