Time to Eat the Dog? On the Cost of Casting Judgement

Scott Doyon discusses the dangers of simplification and the counter-intuitive soundbite, which work against the creation of partnerships that are essential to solving some of our biggest challenges.
July 31, 2012, 8am PDT | Hazel Borys
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"Consider dogs vs. SUVs. What could be wrong with such provocative framing? After all, if it piques interest, people will be more inclined to share. It'll blast its way around the social web, gaining ever greater exposure. More eyeballs, more awareness, more potential converts, right? Maybe. But at what cost?"

Scott Doyon discusses the issue of comparative judgement and the measures we use to determine environmental performance. And how some of them will do nothing but create division:

"Because they reinforce our basest human instinct - our need to cast judgment on the behavior of others - which is in every way contrary to the formation of the complex, local social networks that make sustainability possible. At a time when we need to be reconnecting, opening our hearts and minds to conflicting opinions, exploring shared interests, and charting common ground like never before, the comparative soundbite encourages us to think along the lines of who's doing good and who's not doing good. Who's better and who's worse."

Thanks to Hazel Borys

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Published on Monday, July 30, 2012 in PlaceShakers
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