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Top 10 Urban Planning Issues From 2001

PLANetizen

LOS ANGELES -- The editorial team at PLANetizen has selected the top 10 American urban planning issues that made news in 2001. The finalists were chosen based upon the number of times they were read by visitors to the PLANetizen website -- www.planetizen.com -- the fastest growing web site for the urban planning community.

- The Worst Town In The Nation

- Kunstler Predicts The End Of Tall Buildings

- Ten Cheapest Places To Live

- Harry Potter's Message About Sprawl

- Best Places In 2001

- The Three Most Exciting Trends In Planning

- The Future Of New Urbanism And Architecture

- Ten Cities With The Worst Commute

- So You Want To Be A Planning Director?

- Ten Keys To Walkable Communities

"Smart growth, new urbanism and sprawl continue to be some of the most popular topics for those interested in the urban environment," said Chris Steins, editor of PLANetizen. "But the stories that really stand out are those that challenge conventional urban planning themes."

"The single underlying theme in all of these issues is how our urban environment is changing. The planning community seems to be most interested in how these changes in the urban environment affect our quality of life," said Abhijeet Chavan, managing editor.

Additional details about each of these stories, suitable for publication, can be found at:

http://www.planetizen.com/oped/item.php?id=43

PLANetizen is a one-stop source for urban planning news, commentary, jobs and events. PLANetizen also publishes a free, twice-weekly email newsletter with the week's most popular planning stories. PLANetizen (plan-NET'-a-zen) is visited by over 7,000 planners each day and is supported in the public interest by Urban Insight, Inc.

Related Link: Top 10 Urban Planning Issues From 2001

For more information contact:

Chris Steins and Abhijeet Chavan
PLANetizen

Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.planetizen.com/

Published on:
January 30, 2002 - 6:06pm
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