Will Congestion Pricing Backfire in the U.S.?

The U.S. Department of Transportation in 2007 selected five cities it thought could effectively implement congestion pricing, but none have come to fruition. What's holding back congestion pricing in the U.S.?

London and Singapore have each successfully implemented congestion pricing, a system that charges cars a toll as they enter designated zones around the city. In addition to decreasing traffic in the city center, GHG emissions go down and public transit use increases. London even reported $197 million in revenue.

That same scenario does not play out in the U.S, says Joe Peach of Next American City:

"New York city has twice thrown out plans for a congestion charge, and San Francisco is waiting until 2015 to begin its trial period. When the most enthusiastic response involves waiting four years, you know it's not good news."

Full Story: Congestion Pricing: Not Coming Soon to a US City Near You

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