The Return of the Gravel Road

The paved roads that finally brought rural America into the 20th century are starting to disappear across the Midwest in the 21st.

Local officials, facing rising pavement prices, shrinking budgets and fewer residents, are making tough decisions to regress. In some places, they have even eliminated small stretches of gravel road altogether.

But the decision to return to gravel roads isn't just happening in the Midwest. This may also be happening on a much broader scale.

The Star Tribune out of Minnesota reported on their local decisions on March 26, 2011. Two days later the Press Democrat in California published an article called, "Dirt roads: Not only here in Sonoma County" that focuses on how local transportation officials in Sonoma, Lake, and Mendocino counties have come to the same conclusion as their midwestern counterparts.

Thanks to Mishauno Woggon

Full Story: Making a rural comeback: The old gravel road



Okay, if the B/C ratio is good

I've heard that paved roads pay for themselves if about 150 vehicles use the road each day. Of course, this will vary from location to location, depending on terrain, material costs, soil conditions and weather.

Brand new! Urban Grid City Collection

Each city has its own unique story. Commemorate where you came from or where you want to go.
Grids and Guide Red book cover

Grids & Guides

A notebook for visual thinkers. Available in red and black.
Wood necklace with city map

City Necklaces

These sweet pendants are engraved on a cedar charm with a mini map of selected cities. The perfect gift for friends and family or yourself!

Get the "Green Bible" of educational planning books

Understand the complexities of planning at the local level while preparing for the AICP* exam. Find out why this edition is included in the APA's recommended reading list.