Where the Subway Ends

The New York Times surveys the end of every subway line in the city, from Ozone Park to Coney Island. At most stops, they find a gritty existence. A beautiful page of photos accompanies the article.
August 24, 2008, 1pm PDT | Tim Halbur
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"At the city's often-threadbare fringes, there is an inescapable sense of lonesomeness. There might be a Last Stop Deli, a forlorn bar, a maintenance yard populated mostly by rows of empty trains. There is, surprisingly often, a cemetery.

Yet to visit all the system's extremities is to see that the last stop is not a single, monolithic place. There are subway lines that end, logically, where the city runs out of land; lines that end, anticlimactically, where builders ran out of money; even a few that fetch up in bustling downtowns of one sort or another. From the marshy lowlands of Tottenville to the lush hills of Riverdale to the ceaseless clangor of Flushing, the end of the line manages to take in the entire breadth of the city beyond Midtown Manhattan."

Photo Page

Full Story:
Published on Friday, August 22, 2008 in The New York Times
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