Michael Lewyn's picture
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Michael Lewyn is an assistant professor at Touro Law Center in Long Island.
Member for
 11 years
Contributed
 228 posts
Michael Lewyn is an associate professor at Touro Law Center in Central Islip, NY. His scholarship can be found at http://works.bepress.com/lewyn

Recent Posts

Blog post
5 days ago
In some American cities, the white population is growing while the black population is declining. Is this a result of gentrification or of black upward mobility?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
July 11, 2017, 10am PDT
Some argue that neighborhoods will be willing to accept new housing as long as it is high quality; this argument overlooks a wide variety of other objections to new housing.
Michael Lewyn
July 7, 2017, 7am PDT
Vancouver's exploding housing prices are caused by income inequality, housing scarcity, and a housing bubble, not by foreign investors and vacant housing units.
Sightline
Blog post
June 9, 2017, 5am PDT
In a free market, the richest neighborhoods would ordinarily be the most popular. But some well-off urban neighborhoods are actually losing population. Why?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
May 29, 2017, 1pm PDT
In Zoned Out!, Tom Angotti, of City University New York (CUNY) tries to make the case against upzoning New York's neighborhoods (or at least its poorer ones).
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
May 11, 2017, 12pm PDT
Reports of New York's gentrification are sometimes exaggerated.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
May 2, 2017, 5am PDT
In his new book, Richard Florida worries about segregation and redefines "the creative class."
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
April 21, 2017, 6am PDT
The growth of urban Jewish populations is more evidence that educated Americans are less hostile to city life today than they were in the late 20th century.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
March 28, 2017, 2pm PDT
Some commentators argue that even if cities allow housing supply to expand, more permissive zoning will cause land prices to increase, causing rents to rise rather than fall. This post disagrees.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
March 9, 2017, 1pm PST
This "livable cities" ranking considers transit, walkability, and bikeability.
Michael Lewyn