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Michael Lewyn is an associate professor at Touro College, Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center, in Long Island.
Member for
 15 years
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 296 posts
Michael Lewyn is an associate professor at Touro College, Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center, in Long Island. His scholarship can be found at http://works.bepress.com/lewyn.

Recent Posts

Blog post
October 20, 2020, 12pm PDT
Over the past decade, pedestrian and auto collisions have become more lethal for pedestrians. Could this be caused by carless households moving to pedestrian-hostile places?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
October 5, 2020, 8am PDT
In Right of Way, Angie Schmitt explains why U.S. pedestrian fatalities have increased in recent years.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
September 14, 2020, 12pm PDT
Some cities have become significantly more violent since the George Floyd protests began—but not all. Why have some cities been more successful than others?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
August 19, 2020, 1pm PDT
Equity is a fine value—but on contentious land use issues, equity can be used to support either side of the argument.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
August 3, 2020, 7am PDT
A new book explains why people object to new housing in their neighborhoods, and whether these "neighborhood defenders" are representative of the public as a whole.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
July 6, 2020, 8am PDT
How will COVID-19 and its economic consequences affect housing supply?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
June 19, 2020, 5am PDT
Do protests and riots inevitably lead to crime waves and flight to suburbia? Not always.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
June 2, 2020, 6am PDT
A month or two ago, COVID-19 was primarily a Northeastern problem. Is that still the case?
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
May 11, 2020, 7am PDT
Even some defenders of urbanism fear buildings that are tall enough for elevators. This fear does not seem to be supported by New York infection data.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
April 28, 2020, 12pm PDT
As in metropolitan New York, big, dense cities don't always suffer from coronavirus to a greater extent than their car-oriented suburbs.
Michael Lewyn