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Michael Lewyn is an assistant professor at Touro Law Center in Long Island.
Member for
 13 years
Contributed
 260 posts
Michael Lewyn is an associate professor at Touro Law Center in Central Islip, NY. His scholarship can be found at http://works.bepress.com/lewyn

Recent Posts

Blog post
2 days ago
Even if new housing reduces rents regionwide, scholars are divided as to when and whether new market-rate apartments reduce rents in nearby blocks. A new study seeks to answer this question.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
February 4, 2019, 10am PST
Although individual old buildings may be less expensive than newer ones nearby, historic preservation may make both old and new buildings more expensive.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
January 22, 2019, 10am PST
The Federal Highway Administration's National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) shows that transit use is rising and household vehicle miles traveled are declining—but other data sources paint a more ambiguous picture.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
January 8, 2019, 9am PST
Despite the decline in gas prices, cars are still a luxury for many low-income Americans, and low-income zip codes still tend to have low car ownership rates.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
December 19, 2018, 9am PST
Government-subsidized housing is a useful complement to market-rate housing, but an affordability strategy that relies solely on low-income housing may be impractical.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
December 5, 2018, 11am PST
Jeff Speck's new book not only makes the case for narrow, walkable streets, but also provides more detailed guidance for specialists.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
November 11, 2018, 1pm PST
The Charter of the New Urbanism favors infill development, yet new urbanists sometimes oppose infill, especially in historic urban areas. This post speculates on why that might be the case.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
October 26, 2018, 6am PDT
In The Battle of Lincoln Park, Daniel Kay Hertz chronicles the gentrification of Lincoln Park, and shows how its residents displaced renters and the poor.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
October 5, 2018, 8am PDT
When neighborhoods are allowed to plan and zone without considering the regionwide interest in increasing housing stock, scarcity results.
Michael Lewyn
Blog post
September 9, 2018, 1pm PDT
One common argument against road diets and other pro-walkability policies is that seniors need cars more than anyone else. Is this claim borne out by data?
Michael Lewyn