Todd Litman's picture
3 days ago
Capital Metro in Austin, Texas recently published a set of outstanding resources for planning and designing Transit Oriented Development: a Transit Design Guide, a TOD Priority Tool and a TOD Guide. Way to go, Austin!
Transit Design Guide
Blog post
December 7, 2018, 8am PST

Few issues are more emotional, and therefore vulnerable to bad analysis, than urban crime risk. Solid research indicates that more compact and mixed development tends to increase neighborhood security. Jane Jacobs was right!

Todd Litman
November 1, 2018, 12pm PDT
Surveys indicate that women often feel exposed to threatening and unwelcome behaviour when using public transport. This report examines this problem and potential solutions from various perspectives.
Women’s Safety and Security: A Public Transport Priority
Blog post
October 2, 2018, 7am PDT
The Call to Action on Climate and Health is an ambitious plan to achieve both global climate and health goals. Planners can help identify win-win solutions that provide multiple benefits and so can build broad implementation coalitions.
Todd Litman
October 2, 2018, 5am PDT
The Congress for New Urbanism's Users' "Guide to Code Reform" leads planners through the code reform process, providing tools for governments lacking the capacity to develop a full form-based code.
Public Square: A CNU Journal
September 20, 2018, 2pm PDT
Life is different in Pontevedra.
The Guardian
September 8, 2018, 11am PDT
Transport policy reforms help achieve many Sustainable Development Goals, including poverty reduction; access to healthcare, education, employment, and clean water; gender equality; better settlements; energy conservation; and emission reductions.
Partnership on Sustainable Low Carbon Transport
Blog post
September 4, 2018, 6am PDT
Conventional planning is static, designed to lock in existing land use patterns. We need more dynamic planning to respond to changing household needs and community goals.
Todd Litman
August 28, 2018, 2pm PDT
New research finds lower displacement rates in neighborhoods with more new housing development. Slowing or stopping new development has the opposite of the desired effect, constricting housing supply, driving up rents, and displacing residents.
City Observatory
Blog post
August 27, 2018, 10am PDT
Good research indicates that building middle-priced housing increases affordability through "filtering," as some lower-priced housing occupants move into more expensive units, and over time as the new houses depreciate and become cheaper.
Todd Litman