World

Feature
June 3, 2015, 6am PDT
Amid growing skepticism, an international gathering examines the useful benefits for an age of critical urban challenges.
Michael Mehaffy
June 3, 2015, 5am PDT
Biology Professor Paul Ehrlich's 1968 book, "The Population Bomb," took America and the world by storm. The apocalyptic vision based of population outgrowing its resources appeared to make inherent sense.
The New York Times - Retro Report
June 2, 2015, 7am PDT
A new study indicates that the safest urban streets have lanes that measure 10-10.5 feet wide. Narrower and wider lanes have higher crash frequencies, and wider lanes have higher crash severity.
Streetsblog USA
June 1, 2015, 8am PDT
Penn IUR Co-Directors Genie Birch and Susan Wachter write about the promise of geospatial technologies in promoting sustainable urbanization.
Penn Institute for Urban Research
May 24, 2015, 5am PDT
Gensler, along with partners in China, is exploring ways to implement 3D printing technology. It's time for planners to start letting their imaginations run wild with possibilities.
Rice Kinder Institute for Urban Research
May 22, 2015, 9am PDT
Someone's done the hard work of finding, sorting, and stitching together millions of photos from the Internet to create animated portraits of the evolution of places.
The Verge
May 21, 2015, 2pm PDT
After a splashy project recently hit its crowdfunding goals, one write dares to suggest that such fund raising methods might not be the best idea.
The Guardian Cities
May 21, 2015, 5am PDT
A new Deloitte report evaluates ways that new technologies and mobility services help reduce the need to own and use private automobiles. Helsinki's audacious goal: By 2025, no city resident will need to own a private car.
Smart Mobility
May 20, 2015, 6am PDT
"A German university student has developed a fun new tool for visualizing public transit in a more system-oriented way," according to a post by Sam Sturgis.
CityLab
May 20, 2015, 5am PDT
An IMF working paper determined that global energy subsidies totaled $5.3 trillion this year, the worst offenders are China and the U.S. Placing a price on these subsidies, which include air pollution and carbon emissions, may be key to mitigation.
Reuters
May 19, 2015, 11am PDT
California's economy is not only the "least carbon-intensive" in the United States, it's the second lowest in the world when measured per economic output, according to a new study that evaluates economics and environment.
San Francisco Chronicle
May 19, 2015, 8am PDT
A new study finds that biking to work does wonders for reducing stress levels throughout the day. Too bad most it's so hard to fund biking infrastructure.
Treehugger
May 19, 2015, 7am PDT
The "health, safety, and general welfare" of our communities are poorly served by the outcomes of the status quo.
PlaceShakers
May 14, 2015, 11am PDT
As the world's cities grow ever larger, local governments constantly ask themselves which is better: amalgamating into one metro-wide government, or maintaining autonomy among fragmented jurisdictions? The answer remains unclear.
The Guardian
May 8, 2015, 2pm PDT
Academics and professional planners have access to plenty of research and data to continue to improve and expand bikeshare systems around the world.
Journalist's Resource
May 8, 2015, 11am PDT
The last time carbon dioxide levels were this high was a million years ago. The global community needs to reduce emissions by 80 percent to stop the increase in CO2 levels. The data was reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
CleanTechnica
May 6, 2015, 9am PDT
Animals are more than just guests or co-habitants in our cities, according to an article in New Scientist—they're a critical component of the infrastructure that keeps cities running.
New Scientist
May 4, 2015, 7am PDT
The Milken Institute Global Conference brought hoards of business leaders to Beverly Hills last week. Sessions included some high praise for cities and buoyant predictions about innovation, development, and accommodating six billion city-dwellers.
California Planning & Development Report
May 3, 2015, 7am PDT
Of all the inventions of the modern world, few have been so embraced as artificial light. But constant light, like that which floods city streets and illuminates buildings, is not necessarily healthy or safe. Some cities are trying to go dark.
The Architect's Newspaper
April 29, 2015, 9am PDT
There are animals among us. Boars in Berlin, coyotes in Washington, D.C., and mountain lions in Los Angeles are just a few examples of the wildest populations moving to cities.
National Geographic