Recent articles in The Atlantic and Bloomberg News claimed that Millennials buy more cars than Generation X, but these failed to account for cohort size. Millennials actually purchase fewer vehicles per capita than previous generations.
5 days ago   City Commentary
What amount of expansion, population and vehicle densities, housing mix, and transport policies should growing cities aspire to achieve? This column summarizes my recent research that explores these, and related, issues. Blog Post
Apr 13, 2015   By Todd Litman
New research quantifies public transit impacts on urban development patterns, and resulting benefits. Current transit services reduces U.S. urban land consumption by 27 percent, which reduces VMT, fuel consumption and pollution emissions 8 percent.
Apr 9, 2015   Quantifying Transit’s Impact on GHG Emissions and Energy Use—The Land Use Component
Analysis of incremental tax revenues and public service costs of various development patterns in Madison, Wisconsin indicates significant economic savings from more compact land use. Modest increases in density can provide large fiscal benefits.
Apr 7, 2015   The Fiscal Implications of Development Patterns
The City Observatory's new Cappuccino Congestion Index quantifies the delay that inadequate coffeeshop capacity imposes on caffeine consumers. For cappuccino-sucking urbanites, it is a more severe problem than traffic congestion.
Apr 2, 2015   City Observatory City Commentary
A major new study estimates that sprawl costs the U.S. economy more than a trillion dollars annually, and results, in part, from planning and market distortions. Smart policy reforms can result in more efficient and equitable development.
Mar 19, 2015   New Climate Economy
Planners can do a better job communicating the benefits of high quality public transit and transit-oriented development. We can learn from marketing professionals—it's time to channel Don Draper. Blog Post
Mar 19, 2015   By Todd Litman
Randal O'Toole claims that light rail transit is more dangerous than bus or automobile travel, but he fails to account for exposure or overall safety benefits. This is a good example of bad statistical analysis. Blog Post
Mar 5, 2015   By Todd Litman
Experiments with shared (also called "naked") streets in Auckland, New Zealand show that mixing motorized and non-motorized modes can be safe, friendly, and economically successful.
Feb 26, 2015   Shared Spaces Website
City residents don't need a car if they have good travel options. One condominium offers buyers one year of unlimited Uber rides instead of a parking space.
Feb 25, 2015   SF Gate: ON THE BLOCK