Automobile-oriented planning requires that cities devote signifiant amounts of space to roads and parking—under many conditions each vehicle requires more land than is devoted to housing per capita. Opinion
Yesterday   By Todd Litman
In the next few decades, U.S. governments and businesses are predicted to spend trillions of dollars on infrastructure. This is the reality. The question is: how do we get smart about these investments?
Nov 15, 2014   Infrastructure Crisis Sustainable Solutions
Ambitious new emission reduction targets can be met with strategies that also help achieve other economic, social, and environmental objectives. Opinion
Nov 13, 2014   By Todd Litman
A new report from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group and Frontier Group shows mounting evidence that the Millennial generation’s dramatic shift away from driving is more than temporary. Planning must change to accommodate these demands.
Oct 16, 2014   Millennials in Motion: Changing Travel Habits of Young Americans and the Implications for Public Policy
The new INRIX congestion costing report is another good example of bad analysis. We just want accurate information; hold the hyperbole, please. Opinion
Oct 14, 2014   By Todd Litman
Transportation engineers currently evaluate urban transport system performance using roadway level of service (LOS) ratings. Here are six good reasons to change. Opinion
Sep 29, 2014   By Todd Litman
New report by the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate describes specific actions which can strengthen economic performance and reduce climate change risks. A key strategy is to build better, more productive cities.
Sep 17, 2014   Better Growth Better Climate
A significant portion of vehicle travel consists of chauffeuring: additional travel to transport a non-driver. The new Chauffeuring Burden Index calculates its direct and indirect costs. Why do these costs receive such little attention in planning? Opinion
Sep 2, 2014   By Todd Litman
Demographia's International Housing Affordability Surveys are widely used to compare cities and evaluate urban development policies, but there are good reasons to question their analysis methods, starting with their definition of "house." Opinion
Aug 15, 2014   By Todd Litman
A new study, "Community Design, Street Networks, and Public Health" published in the Journal of Transport & Health finds that increased local street connectivity improves public health outcomes, apparently by encouraging more walking and cycling.
Aug 12, 2014   Denver Business Journal