Technology

Private, crowdsourced mobile phone applications addressing urban mobility collect troves of data on how cities flow. So how can municipalities tap into these databases to accurately understand the movement of their citizens? Exclusive
5 days ago  By Maayan Dembo
Japan has announced plans to build a base on the moon by 2020. The base would be built and used by robots.
Jun 1, 2010   Popular Science
The Federal Railroad Administration does not allow for the mixing of train types for safety reasons, which proved a key obstacle for Caltrain's plan for electrification. As a pilot project,they are allowing the line to utilize electric multiple units
May 30, 2010   Mercury News via Palo Alto Daily News
Nissan Leafs, that is, and only for the year, though not one of these 19,000 preorders for the all-electric, plug-in car has yet to be shipped. The Leafs shouldn't venture too far from home - the range is 100 miles on a full charge.
May 29, 2010   The New York Times - Business Day
<em>Wired</em> profiles Charles Komanoff, who's hoping to use his immense spreadsheet of New York City traffic data to clear the city's congestion.
May 26, 2010   Wired
A new App from the Museum of London uses geo tagging and Google Maps to identify locations seen in their artwork, giving users the ability to see how the historic site used to look.
May 25, 2010   Creative Review
Metrics provider Ookla rates the cities in the U.S. and around the world on the speed of their internet connection. No.1, no surprise, is San Jose, CA. No. 2?
May 25, 2010   Gigaom
China has plans not only to expand its own network of high speed trains, but to build the trains for the rest of the world. They are already giving Japan and Europe a run for their money. Not bad considering their first HSR line opened in 2008.
May 19, 2010   The Washington Post
Advanced laser imaging technology known as lidar has proven to be an effective and fast way to map ancient Mayan villages.
May 18, 2010   The New York Times
The line may only be 12 miles, but the train speeds at 312 mph. The Secretary of Transportation was in Japan as part of the effort to bring high speed rail to the U.S. though it's not clear whether he is in fact considering the maglev technology.
May 17, 2010   The New York Times - Global Business
Microsoft uses GPS data collected from your trips to predict where you're going and give you advice on how to get there more efficiently.
May 12, 2010   Fast Company