University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute

The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute released its eighth report on peak motorization in the U.S., an evaluation of time spent traveling for a broad category of purposes, not just work. From 2004 to 2014, total time decreased.
Sep 2, 2015   The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute
According to the Census Bureau's American Community Survey on commuting to work, one subregion in the Bay Area can claim accolades for having achieved the largest drop in solo-commuting from 2006, scoring the third lowest drive-alone rate in 2013.
Aug 17, 2015   The Sacramento Bee - Capitol Alert
Manufacturers say yes, arguing that the reduction in vehicle crashes decreases traffic congestion. Other features improve traffic flow. But these are safety technologies, not emission-reducing measures, that critics worry will water-down CAFE.
Mar 9, 2015   The Wall Street Journal
The effect of low gas prices on motor vehicle selection by consumers could set back President Barack Obama's climate legacy, which includes obtaining fuel economy standards of 54.5 mpg by 2025.
Dec 31, 2014   The Wall Street Journal
A recent study at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute showed that September saw the largest decline in average fuel economy, from 25.8 mpg to 25.3 mpg, since December 2011.
Oct 9, 2014   24/7 Wall Street
Is there a relationship between carless households and density of college graduates? Derek Thompson of The Atlantic connected the dots using Michael Sivak's latest 'peak car' study and saw a relationship between the two variables.
Jan 29, 2014   The Atlantic
As a nation, we are driving less, but we are increasingly stuck in traffic. What explains this paradox? Using Portland as an example, where driving peaked in 2004, Joseph Rose attempts to explain with lots of help from transportation experts.
Sep 20, 2013   The Oregonian
While the decline may not be visible, total auto ownership peaked in 2008 according to a new report by Michael Sivak of the University of Michigan's Transportation Research Institute. He set out to determine the cause - was it the economic recession?
Jun 20, 2013   The Atlantic