Interior Department

March 22, 2015, 11am PDT
Despite only applying to Federal lands where a small amount of fracking takes place, energy companies are strongly opposed, perhaps fearing that states without fracking rules could adopt them, which is one of the goals of the Interior Department.
The Wall Street Journal
January 29, 2015, 8am PST
With the turnover of leadership in the Senate to Republicans in January, the only Keystone question was whether advocates had enough votes to override a promised presidential veto. Turned out they were unable to overcome the first filibuster of 2015.
Politico Pro
January 28, 2015, 7am PST
A mere day after the Interior Department announced it would permanently block drilling in much of the Arctic Refuge by designating it as wilderness, it proposed allowing drilling in the Gulf, along Atlantic coast, and surprisingly, offshore Alaska.
McClatchy Washington Bureau
January 27, 2015, 6am PST
Setting off a political firestorm in the words of one journalist, President Obama proposed to designate most of the pristine Arctic National Wildlife Refuge as wilderness, angering congressional Republicans.
The Wall Street Journal
January 15, 2015, 10am PST
President Barack Obama hopes to add to his "climate legacy" by having the EPA adopt the nation's first regulations to reduce methane emissions, the second most prevalent greenhouse gas emission after carbon dioxide, but far more powerful.
Los Angeles Times
May 21, 2013, 8am PDT
Environmentalists charged that the new federal rules guiding hydraulic fracturing do not protect the environment and inform the public about the fracking process. The new Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell, appeared prepared for their comments.
The New York Times
February 7, 2013, 6am PST
On Wednesday, President Obama introduced REI CEO Sally Jewell as his nominee to become the new head of the Interior Department. Philip Bump examines how her unconventional background makes her the perfect pick.
Grist
January 17, 2013, 12pm PST
With yesterday's announcement that Interior Secretary Ken Salazar will soon step down, the three top environmental posts in the federal government are waiting to be filled. The vacancies are further muddling the administration's second term agenda.
The Washington Post