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Social / Demographics

The general principle is simple: more density equals lower prices and less environmental impact. But suburbia's imprint is deep, both on cities themselves and on how we expect to inhabit them.
18 hours ago   Grist
Mayor Ed Lee has announced plans to devote $28.9 million to housing, medical aid, and counseling programs. Nonprofits will partner with the city in an effort to put rising municipal revenue to good use.
May 30, 2015   SFGate
Although unemployment has declined, according to this report commutes are getting longer. "Job sprawl" often plagues minority and poor areas where housing is more affordable.
May 29, 2015   Al Jazeera America
Would you like a cerveza with that? A hip neighborhood in Chicago will play host to the first alcohol-serving Taco Bell. Isolated incident, or the future of fast food?
May 29, 2015   Chicago Tribune
New analysis of U.S. Census data dating back to 1880 reveals more about the breadth and depth of patterns of racial segregation.
May 22, 2015   Vox
Newly released population data provides entre for a discussion about the nature of cities.
May 22, 2015   FiveThirtyEight
The U.S. Census Bureau's 2014 population estimates shows persistent trends of growth in the Sun Belt along with a few other noteworthy data points.
May 21, 2015   U.S. Census Bureau
While bikeshare garners a lot of attention from the white and wealthy, it is a less obvious choice for low-income communities. Difficulties include weather, time constraints, and overall demand for non-auto modes.
May 19, 2015   Vox
The "health, safety, and general welfare" of our communities are poorly served by the outcomes of the status quo.
May 19, 2015   PlaceShakers
Ben Adler of Grist makes a convincing case of why we should stick with gas taxes and not switch to a road usage charge, as Oregon will do July 1 in a limited program. Tax what you burn, not by how much you drive, he argues, to get the best results.
May 18, 2015   Grist
Statistics sage Nate Silver crunches the numbers illustrating the relationship between U.S. cities' overall diversity and their neighborhood diversity. His conclusion: the greater diversity, the greater the segregation.
May 18, 2015   FiveThirtyEight