Social / Demographics

Don't worry; we're not mentioning belts to make you feel too guilty to enjoy today's meal.
12 hours ago   Vox
Brooklyn-based artist Ekene Ijeoma newest piece shows what parts of New York City are affordable to different people across the spectrum of salaries in the form of crystalline islands called "wage islands."
Nov 17, 2015   Doggerel
A new study confirms much of what we already suspect about the choices people make about where to live, but with a far-reaching, scientific approach.
Nov 12, 2015   CityLab
As rising costs expel artists from urban cores, some small towns are positioning themselves as unlikely magnets for creative expression.
Nov 12, 2015   Nonprofit Quarterly
A 12-story residential tower proposed for a Vancouver neighborhood is receiving pushback from housing advocates and the local Chinese community.
Nov 12, 2015   The Province
Academia's "two-body problem" may be affecting other industries as women pursue more specialized careers and marry similarly educated men. Two-career couples are likely to gravitate toward larger metro areas with job opportunities for both partners.
Nov 10, 2015   StatChat: the blog of the UVA Demographics Research Group
Blog Post
Since presidential candidates tend to be wealthy, middle-aged heads of households, and wealthy middle-aged families tend to live in sprawl, one might think that most Republican presidential candidates live in sprawl. Blog Post
Nov 9, 2015   By Michael Lewyn
A researcher at Rice University finds that proclamations of Houston’s affordability, gentrification, and growth are just myths.
Nov 9, 2015   The Urban Edge
People are looking for ideas in the Bay Area. Across the water from the calcified world of San Francisco, Oakland offers the flexibility and energy to build an equitable and dynamic resource that benefits the entire region.
Nov 4, 2015   SPUR Urbanist
Blog Post
Warning: This blog post contains explicit language.  Blog Post
Nov 3, 2015   By Jennifer Evans-Cowley
It's the end of an era. After 36 years, China has decided to end its restrictive one-child policy, by allowing couples to have two children. Why the change? In three words: an aging population.
Oct 30, 2015   BBC News