Form-Based Code

June 18, 2013, 10am PDT
London calling! PlaceMaker Hazel Borys fuses her passions for great cities, efficient transit, civic art and form-based coding into one lavishly documented examination of the English capital. Cheers, mates!
PlaceShakers
May 17, 2013, 7am PDT
Form-based codes extract the DNA of the desired local character, and enable it by right. Hazel Borys talks about how to get the numbers right in this week's Back of the Envelope.
PlaceShakers
May 3, 2013, 6am PDT
On 50th anniversary of the Jetsons, Hazel Borys celebrates city planning that isn't pie in the sky, but instead lets us cast a shadow.
PlaceShakers
April 23, 2013, 8am PDT
Ambition is good, but don't bite off more than you can chew. Hazel Borys applies this valuable lesson to form-based codes.
PlaceShakers
March 11, 2013, 10am PDT
Generalist Geoff Dyer delivers his walkability design tactics magnum opus on PlaceShakers. His years of practical experience are conveniently condensed for your consumption.
PlaceShakers
February 22, 2013, 6am PST
Like any tool, form-based codes must be wielded skillfully for beautiful results. Hazel Borys kicks off a series on ways we go awry.
PlaceShakers
Blog post
February 12, 2013, 12pm PST
There may be a way to supply some of the benefits of form-based codes without heavy-handed aesthetic regulation. In theory, a form-based code could be limited to verifiable characteristics such as setbacks, yard types, building height, frontage size and lot coverage.
Michael Lewyn
February 12, 2013, 6am PST
Can urban form help address the loneliness that so often accompanies aging? In a new blog post, Hazel Borys examines some remedies for severed connections.
PlaceShakers
October 2, 2012, 10am PDT
Zoning reform is a political campaign. Coder Susan Henderson talks about audience dynamics, with a special focus on how to communicate with property owners and the developer community.
PlaceShakers
August 22, 2012, 5am PDT
Hazel Borys concludes her popular photo series on lessons from Canadian urbanism with a look at Ottawa, whose charming historic character is illegal to reproduce today in its more auto-centric outskirts.
PlaceShakers
August 19, 2012, 5am PDT
When we think urbanism, we often think cities. But small towns embody many of the elements of walkability that are illegal in most places. This pictorial review offers some palatable insights.
PlaceShakers
August 17, 2012, 5am PDT
Getting along is much easier when the fronts and backs of buildings are rational: public activities out front, private out back, and a street wall to keep them orderly.
PlaceShakers
July 28, 2012, 5am PDT
Several collaborative Google Maps cover Traditional Neighborhood Developments (TNDs) across the US and Canada as well as form-based codes globally. Are yours listed?
PlaceShakers
July 5, 2012, 10am PDT
Matt Bevilacqua talks shop with Emily Talen, whose new book explores the way land use regulation has shaped American cities and how it's all about to change.
Next American City
May 18, 2012, 9am PDT
Dan Parolek kicks off a series on recent efforts to revitalize the Queen City based on a strong foundation of coveted resources, including a variety of urban housing types.
Better! Cities & Towns
February 23, 2012, 7am PST
Charlie Gardner writes about what can be found in, and more importantly what is excluded from, one of the most progressive code revisions to be adopted by a major American city.
Old Urbanist
December 24, 2011, 7am PST
Hazel Borys discusses how several key form-based guidelines for retail can encourage success in the most risky of all development types.
PlaceShakers
October 19, 2011, 2pm PDT
At last week's Municipal Art Society Summmit in New York City, one panel of experts attempted to answer just that. Neither overbearing zoning rules, contextual zoning, or the current environmental review process was left untouched.
Streetsblog
September 20, 2011, 11am PDT
Industrial uses have long been banished to the edges -- but recently savvy cities are seeing the value of making them walkable again.
PlaceShakers
October 9, 2010, 9am PDT
Ben Brown reads Robert Putnam's new book, which explores the ways in which religion in the U.S. causes greater intolerance but simultaneously a greater civic engagement and likelihood of helping others through charitable acts.
PlaceShakers