History / Preservation

5 hours ago
A handful of Delray residents refuse to be displaced by industry, but the plan for a new bridge may mean they don't have a choice.
Detroit Free Press
2 days ago
As the state's worst wildfire season ever refuses to end, an analyst from UCLA considers how land use and building codes determine the location and extent of the damage.
The Conversation
December 1, 2017, 12pm PST
Researchers have created a digital database of archaeological sites in the U.S.—and thousands could be lost to sea-level rise.
Pacific Standard
December 1, 2017, 11am PST
A proposed 1.4 mile safety barrier may require additional review, and could further delay the project
MinnPost
November 29, 2017, 8am PST
As part of an interdepartmental effort, the city's planning department is embedding an explicit equity lens into how it considers the distribution of civic resources.
Next City
November 28, 2017, 8am PST
Building with wood is back in fashion, but lumber producers have to reckon with thorny politics and new timber-based materials that have yet to be truly defined.
The Architect's Newspaper
November 26, 2017, 9am PST
Harvard Square bears the name of a prestigious private university, but it's still public space. More community organizations are taking a role in determining its future in an era of change for the historic location.
Harvard Magazine
November 21, 2017, 11am PST
Robert Steuteville reviews Cities Alive, by Michael Mehaffy, describing the newly released book as "an important analysis for urbanism."
Public Square: A CNU Journal
November 21, 2017, 7am PST
Blogger and planners Pete Saunders is acknowledging black urbanists from all over the spectrum of civic involvement.
The Corner Side Yard
November 16, 2017, 2pm PST
"You could be forgiven for reading the art as a message to less-than-opulent New Yorkers: You’ve lost your place," writes Michael Friedman.
CityLab
November 11, 2017, 1pm PST
History shows that there's more than one way to control flooding, but the best ideas are also urban amenities.
Houston Chronicle
November 11, 2017, 11am PST
Disease mapping made a significant leap forward in the 19th century, and data scientists and geographic information scientists are still contributing to the public health field.
Sidewalk Labs
November 11, 2017, 5am PST
Renovations of historic structures in Philly are an example of the nationwide importance of the historic tax credit.
The Philadelphia Inquirer
November 9, 2017, 7am PST
An oil town in a red state proves we don't have to talk about climate change to adapt to it.
Governing
November 6, 2017, 9am PST
The House GOP tax plan, which Trump wanted to name the "Cut, Cut, Cut" bill, was intended to cut taxes, but it's also cutting credits, like the federal $7,500 electric vehicle tax credit. How much would its elimination affect EV sales?
The Hill
October 30, 2017, 8am PDT
The creator of "The Wire" talks to CityLab about "The Deuce," New York City in the 1970s, and how strategies for one town won't always work for another.
CityLab
October 27, 2017, 5am PDT
A new book sheds light on maps created by cartographers in the Soviet Union that dove into remarkable detail about buildings, transportation networks, and other infrastructure in cities across the United States and around the world.
National Geographic
October 26, 2017, 5am PDT
Threats facing major U.S. cultural sites today include development, drilling, and the federal government.
The Architect's Newspaper
October 10, 2017, 2pm PDT
The Associated Press explores the trend of churches rebuilt as breweries.
Associated Press via Miami Herald
October 10, 2017, 1pm PDT
What makes one building worth saving and another worth destroying? Strong Towns' Rachel Quednau explores the line between destruction and preservation.
Strong Towns