Jane Jacobs

September 7, 2014, 7am PDT
A recent article takes a controversial stance contrary to the argument of Jane Jacobs that old buildings equal affordable, diverse neighborhoods.
Market Urbanism
August 20, 2014, 8am PDT
Alex Marshall discusses whether Jane Jacobs' famous "Sidewalk Ballet" is dead on the streets of New York City.
Governing
July 28, 2014, 10am PDT
Could the Los Angeles River use its own 'power broker'?
The Planning Report
Feature
June 25, 2014, 5am PDT
Research across a range of fields is beginning to offer useful new guidance for planning policy and practice—and pointing the way to more effective "bottom-up" strategies.
Michael Mehaffy
May 15, 2014, 2pm PDT
Emily Badger crunches the data on the argument by Jane Jacobs regarding the importance of old buildings to the economic health and quality of life of cities—an opinion described by Badger as "received wisdom among planners and urban theorists."
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
January 11, 2014, 9am PST
The opponents of New York University's controversial expansion plan for Greenwich Village owe their recent court victory to the legacy of Jane Jacobs' legendary fight against the proposed Lower Manhattan Expressway.
The New York Times
Blog post
November 29, 2013, 10am PST
At least one Hanukah song is easily adaptable by urbanists.
Michael Lewyn
May 30, 2013, 8am PDT
If Jane Jacobs's theory that face-to-face encounters make for better cities is correct, a new metric that measures the ability of a city to encourage random social interactions could prove essential in shaping urban policy.
Fast Company Co.Exist
March 27, 2013, 12pm PDT
A rambling walk through New York City, with no destination in mind, reveals to FT columnist John Kay the value of unplanned social interactions - a value that's behind Yahoo’s recent policy limiting telecommuting.
The Financial Times
February 28, 2013, 10am PST
In the fifty years since Jane Jacobs introduced the "eyes on the street" theory, it's become a commonly accepted conceit that a mix of use reduces crime. A new study calls that theory into question.
Next City
February 15, 2013, 12pm PST
Fifty years after Jane Jacobs published her seminal book, "her vision of urban change [has] won the day," says Inga Saffron. Though her vision of physical diversity has prevailed, "that vision is also giving us a new kind of sterility."
The New Republic
January 22, 2013, 9am PST
The old cool: Sealing yourself inside suburban air conditioning. The new cool? According to Howard Blackson, it's the joy to be found outside, connecting with one another and the world we share.
PlaceShakers
December 16, 2012, 11am PST
"The Nation’s" longtime architecture critic and author of the classic, "Asphalt Nation: How the Automobile Took Over America and How We Can Take it Back" passed away Nov. 5. In her obituary, Preston Shiller contrasts her with another "Jane" - Jacobs.
The Nation
December 7, 2012, 11am PST
In a recent paper, urban theorist Stephen Marshall rehashes Jane Jacobs's criticism of city planning as a pseudoscience built "on a foundation of nonsense." Can science and design be reconciled to provide planning a more stable foundation?
Scientific American
June 30, 2012, 1pm PDT
James Trainor looks back at the history of New York's "adventure playgrounds" of the 1960s and 70s, tracing their origin back to the original Central Park dust-up between Robert Moses and local housewives.
CABINET
June 28, 2012, 5am PDT
To some, "the suburbs" mean bland neighborhoods outside of a vibrant city life. But demographic and land-use changes are making Lakis Polycarpou and others rethink the definitions of "urban" and "suburban."
POLIS
May 30, 2012, 10am PDT
Can a "munching tour" along "an auto-focused commercial strip of tattered, 1970s-era Americana 5 miles from downtown" Charlotte help redefine what "urbanism" in 21st-century America means for Mary Newsom?
Citiwire.net
May 5, 2012, 9am PDT
On the anniversary of Jane Jacobs birth 96 years ago, Anthony Flint explores the striking similarities between the planning doyenne and anti-planning agitators.
Better! Cities & Towns
Blog post
April 11, 2012, 11am PDT

There is a certain irony in community stalwarts in testy Greenwich Village wanting to have the stale housing slabs hovering over the bland park composing Washington Square Village declared an architectural landmark that will somehow thwart New York University from overdeveloping further the singular super block.

“Fugataboutit,” would be a relative polite New Yorker’s observation by anyone who has ever been to this dance before, as I have. The plea is really just a feint to get the retro-redevelopment realists involved into a backroom of one of the proposal’s big buck backers to splice and dice the project so it can be swallowed by all without choking to a political death.  

Sam Hall Kaplan
March 10, 2012, 9am PST
Fortune has re-published a provocative essay by Jane Jacobs, originally published in the magazine in 1958, as large scale urban renewal projects were taking off in cities across the country.
CNN/Money