Planetizen - Urban Planning News, Jobs, and Education

Melanie Zanona

March 12, 2018, 7am PDT
Trump's animus towards using federal funds to replace a century-old, hurricane-damaged rail tunnel under the Hudson River is so strong that he warned Congress he will veto a spending bill they must pass by March 23 to keep the government operating.
The Hill
July 28, 2017, 9am PDT
Unlike the House Appropriations Committee's DOT budget that reduces spending by almost 4 percent from current levels and eliminates the TIGER grant program, its Senate counterpart increased transportation spending, including the TIGER grant budget.
The Hill
July 24, 2017, 6am PDT
While reduced from current levels, the House Appropriations Committee budgeted far more than what President Trump had proposed, but they agreed with him to eliminate the TIGER grant program and reduce transit investments, though by a lesser amount.
The Hill
June 11, 2017, 7am PDT
President Trump made a compelling case for reducing the length of time needed to construct major infrastructure projects to justify the creation of a new White House council to streamline permitting. Only one problem: it already exists.
U.S. News & World Report
May 8, 2017, 10am PDT
Congress passed a $1.1 trillion omnibus spending bill to keep the government operating through September that also restores funding to transportation programs that the president had eliminated or greatly reduced. Trump signed the bill Friday.
The Hill
March 16, 2017, 8am PDT
The showman captured America's attention with a promise to "make America great again" with a $1 trillion infrastructure plan. Receiving scant attention are the infrastructure grant programs he'll cut in order to fund massive defense spending.
The Hill
March 2, 2017, 11am PST
While he has yet to explain how he would pay for the plan, the 'anti-regulation' president did add a costly and controversial requirement on Tuesday — a 'Buy America' provision that likely extends beyond the existing regulation.
NPR
September 9, 2016, 10am PDT
Surprisingly, legislators are rewarded for supporting new gas taxes: they get reelected, according to a new analysis by the American Road and Transportation Builders Association. What's more, they overwhelmingly hail from red states.
The Hill