Slate

December 9, 2011, 10am PST
Between the Obama Administration's patchwork approach to funding and outright Republican opposition, high speed rail appears to be dead.
Slate
November 28, 2011, 8am PST
The "utopian" cities being built from scratch in Asia to accommodate its fantastic rate of urbanization are striving to be smarter and greener, but may also be financially risky.
Slate
November 26, 2011, 1pm PST
In this piece, Greg Lindsay take a cautiously optimistic stance on whether or not from-scratch Asian cities are the way to address urban overpopulation.
Slate
October 13, 2011, 6am PDT
While some may be disappointed by how cities aren't yet swarming with robots and automated cars, Frank Swain writes that it's a matter of when we humans can tailor our landscapes to enable the new technology.
Slate
October 12, 2011, 12pm PDT
The FHWA says that 40% of all traffic accidents happen at intersections, and many of those are caused by left turns. A new type of intersection called the "diverging diamond" takes left turns out of the picture.
Slate
August 17, 2011, 1pm PDT
<em>Slate</em> looks at the work and vast urban transformations brought about under the leadership of New York City Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.
Slate
May 12, 2011, 2pm PDT
Witold Rybczynski writes the epitaph for the McMansion. With the housing market in the toilet, Rybczynski says new homebuyers are going to be seeking something smaller, more affordable and possibly not a single-family home.
Slate
March 16, 2011, 6am PDT
Slate looks at America's long history of dreaming up grand stadiums that end up unbuilt, from a waterfront stadium on Manhattan's West Side to a floating stadium in Puget Sound.
Slate
January 15, 2011, 7am PST
Streetcars -- a relatively old transportation technology -- have more traction than high tech solutions like monorails in the modern age of mobility. Want proof? Just look at Disneyland, says Tom Vanderbilt.
Slate
December 6, 2010, 11am PST
In an experiment in social data gathering, Slate's Michael Agger suggests that there is a host of ways we could be contributing our personal data to help make better policy decisions.
Slate
December 4, 2010, 1pm PST
I.M. Pei, Robert A.M. Stern, Daniel Libeskind, Louis Kahn, Frank Gehry - all of these architects were height-challenged. Witold Rybczynski writes in Slate about why great architects are usually short and what that means for the built environment.
Slate
October 21, 2010, 5am PDT
75 years after the first meter was installed in Oklahoma City, cities are beginning to rethink traditional parking regulation strategies. Tom Vanderbilt considers the options.
Slate
August 2, 2010, 9am PDT
At $41,000 the new Chevrolet Volt is a "rich man's ride." Charles Lane asks why is President Obama offering federal tax credits of $7,500 to help better-off American's buy expensive cars?
Slate
August 2, 2010, 7am PDT
Tom Vanderbilt explains adroitly "how not having a car became Hollywood shorthand for loser." Why does the film industry have such contempt for the carless?
Slate
July 2, 2010, 11am PDT
The idea of separated bicycle lanes is growing in popularity. Tom Vanderbilt at Slate looks at the increase in investment and attention to making room for bicycles and increasing safety so more people will ride.
Slate
June 29, 2010, 8am PDT
As part of its series looking at improving transportation in the U.S., <em>Slate</em> delves into the intricacies of parking requirements and how they impact transportation and traffic in cities.
Slate
June 21, 2010, 5am PDT
<em>Slate</em> is soliciting ideas from its readers to improve the nation's transportation system.
Slate
May 10, 2010, 8am PDT
Slate's Fred Kaplan points out that the Times Square bomber was thwarted because of Jacob's famous "eyes on the street."
Slate
April 5, 2010, 2pm PDT
Witold Rybczynski says that people have lost their faith in city-driven urban planning, and that the private marketplace is driving the changes we need today.
Slate
March 10, 2010, 7am PST
Slate continues its series on wayfinding with the little-known story of the symbolic conflicts among the U.S., the former Soviet Union and Japan over how to direct people in a time of crisis.
Slate