Scientific American

May 20, 2009, 10am PDT
This piece from <em>Scientific American</em> looks at the jurisdictional challenge of conserving water in the cross-state Ogallala Aquifer, one of the world's largest sources of freshwater and the backbone of the nation's farm economy.
Scientific American
May 8, 2009, 11am PDT
Despite a congressional ruling last year that prevents them, wight uranium mining operations have been approved near the Grand Canyon.
Scientific American
September 27, 2008, 5am PDT
This piece from <em>Scientific American</em> looks at plans for three "eco-cities".
Scientific American
April 18, 2008, 9am PDT
<p>Drug traffickers, growers and drug law enforcement agents are wreaking havok on the forests of Central America, where large plots of forest are clear-cut for drug crop growing and sprayed to eliminate illicit substances.</p>
Scientific American
June 30, 2006, 1pm PDT
New research in Nature indicates that conditions are right for a 100-mile stretch of California's San Andreas Fault to release pressure that has been building.
Scientific American
January 18, 2006, 11am PST
A new study reveals some surprising results about how people inhale the most air pollution on a daily basis.
Scientific American
September 7, 2005, 7am PDT
Scientific American releases its prescient article from 2001, titled "Drowning New Orleans." The article predicts "a major hurricane could swamp New Orleans under 20 feet of water, killing thousands," as a result of land use policies.
Scientific American
August 30, 2005, 5am PDT
The middle of the 21st century promises massive changes in everything from geopolitics to the environment.
Scientific American
March 4, 2005, 11am PST
Scientific American examines the long-term geophysical changes caused by the earthquake that spawned the deadly Indonesian tsunami.
Scientific American
August 4, 2004, 5am PDT
New research shows that animals can learn to follow man-made routes to make trips easier.
Scientific American
April 6, 2004, 11am PDT
Scientific American reports on the cause of the devastating eight-year drought that plagued the central U.S. in the 1930s.
Scientific American
November 29, 2003, 9am PST
The annual 'Red List' catalogues species threatened by extinction and the latest version includes more than 12,000 entries.
Scientific American
October 23, 2003, 9am PDT
Our electric power grid our the nation's circulatory system. Scientific American examines how to keep the nation healthy.
Scientific American
April 16, 2003, 11am PDT
Attempts to jam GPS-based weapons and navigation systems are a reminder of just how vulnerable GPS technology really is.
Scientific American
January 3, 2003, 1pm PST
Researches at two U.S. universities have found the "fingerprint" of global warming.
Scientific American
September 17, 2002, 11am PDT
Scientific American re-examines the thinking about how skyscrapers can be safer.
Scientific American
June 5, 2002, 11am PDT
Scientific American provides a fascinating introduction to how GPS devices work.
Scientific American
April 22, 2002, 12pm PDT
Scientific American presents a fascinating debate concerning Bj&#248;rn Lomborg's claims in his book, The Skeptical Environmentalist.
Scientific American
January 18, 2002, 6am PST
Edward O. Wilson argues in his new book, The Future of Life, that we have entered the Century of the Environment.
Scientific American
October 11, 2001, 7am PDT
A month after the terrorist attacks, MIT structural engineers provide an in-depth analysis of the collapse of the World Trade Center towers. They point out the vulnerabilities of tall buildings and present recommendations for strengthening skyscrapers.
Scientific American