Newsweek

September 18, 2008, 11am PDT
In Salemi, Italy, 3000 villas ravaged in a 1968 earthquake are now on the market for about U.S.$1.41. However, interested buyers must adhere to a number of stipulations, including a two-year deadline for development.
Newsweek
July 22, 2008, 10am PDT
<p>Washington D.C.'s National Mall is crumbling. Many say now's the time to start thinking about a new future for one of America's most prized public spaces.</p>
Newsweek
July 17, 2008, 2pm PDT
<p>The much-maligned rail system is being reconsidered, as gas prices and environmental awareness send people looking for solutions. But can Amtrak step up to the plate?</p>
Newsweek
July 2, 2008, 6am PDT
<p>Grading countries for their environmental friendliness reveals some surprising results about which countries aren't doing enough to clean themselves up.</p>
Newsweek
April 28, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>Newsweek profiles the most influential environmental leaders of the last century.</p>
Newsweek
July 27, 2007, 5am PDT
<p>With environmental issues increasingly center stage in the public consciousness, the demand for 'green' jobs -- such as urban planners -- is growing quickly.</p>
Newsweek
October 11, 2006, 7am PDT
<p>At a Phoenix hospital, thoughtful building design creates a healing environment for patients.</p>
Newsweek
October 9, 2006, 10am PDT
Even as many developed countries are facing population declines, the U.S. population reaches 300 million this month. What does the demographic milestone mean for the nation?
Newsweek
June 15, 2006, 7am PDT
The contest for California governor may hinge on who is perceived to be the greenest candidate. Schwarzenegger is rolling out a new, green image, but an environmental initiative on the ballot could undermine his message.
Newsweek
May 9, 2006, 11am PDT
When each interstate exit sign passed can mean saving ten thousand dollars in home prices, more and more people are "driving till they qualify". Welcome to the world of "extreme commuting".
Newsweek
February 28, 2006, 10am PST
With a booming economy, a population bursting with enthusiasm, and increased investment in infrastructure, the world's largest democracy is moving closer to the world's richest democracy, says Newsweek editor Fareed Zakaria.
Newsweek
November 17, 2005, 7am PST
Electric-car driver was not an eco-terrorist, FBI admits, and settles for $100,000.
Newsweek
September 29, 2005, 2pm PDT
While the core of historical New Orleans remains, the buildings and architecture of Biloxi have been completely destroyed.
Newsweek
September 28, 2005, 3pm PDT
The village of Huangbaiyu will be part of an innovative joint U.S.-China development project to create an ecologically-balanced area. Could this be a model for China's new urbanism?
Newsweek
September 6, 2005, 9am PDT
The success of urban recovery depends most on how a city was doing before the disaster struck. New Orleans had been declining for years, according to Newsweek's Jonathan Alter.
Newsweek
August 5, 2005, 7am PDT
The great desert has leaped over the Mediterranean. Is climate change to blame -- or man and his works?
Newsweek
January 24, 2005, 7am PST
A new collection of essays, 'The Resilient City' explores how cities bounce back after a catastrophe.
Newsweek
December 26, 2004, 1pm PST
A pair of architects -- Sejima & Nishizawa -- are about to make their mark on cities across the globe.
Newsweek
October 4, 2004, 1pm PDT
Abandoning suburbs, they find cities more rewarding and interesting.
Newsweek
September 20, 2004, 7am PDT
As birthrates continue to drop, especially in aging countries, planners are being asked to consider how to plan for shrinking cities.
Newsweek