Cities

July 31, 2015, 8am PDT
As the nation becomes more racially diverse, so too do the suburbs.
Brookings: The Avenue
July 21, 2015, 10am PDT
As abstract as the study of philosophy may seem, it has to take place somewhere. Philosophy professor David Kishik posits that cities have influenced the development of philosophical ideas, from Socrates' Athens to William James' New York.
New York Times
July 9, 2015, 11am PDT
A new report by the Urban Land Institute, "Density: Drivers, Dividends and Debates," examines the concept of density, its impacts, and how it can best be achieved in cities around the world.
Density Drivers Dividends and Debates
July 9, 2015, 6am PDT
Pushing back on a version of futurism that imagines cities as a collection of iconic structures devoid of people and interactions.
Project For Public Spaces
Blog post
May 7, 2015, 10am PDT
Income inequality, housing affordability, and residential segregation are big challenges that require more self-critical analysis and less civic self-promotion.
Dean Saitta
April 26, 2015, 11am PDT
Secretary of State John Kerry recently began a two-year term as the chair of the Acrtic Council. He used the occasion to make a call for a stronger role for cities in international efforts to fight climate change.
The Washington Post
April 14, 2015, 8am PDT
What helps make a downtown family friendly? Safe places to play, safe streets, good schools and attainable housing, writes Jennifer Hill.
Community Builders
February 24, 2015, 2pm PST
For half a century, suburbs surpassed city centers in population and job growth. These economic and demographic trends appear to be reversing. America's cities have grown faster than outlying areas and new research that jobs are coming with them.
Surging City Center Job Growth
December 31, 2014, 9am PST
A post on Gizmodo traces the long and evolving history of defensive fortifications and how they influenced how cities were built and how people lived.
Gizmodo
Feature
December 31, 2014, 5am PST
A deeper look at the traffic data on Planetizen reveals trends from the planning and urban design conversation of 2014.
James Brasuell
Blog post
December 29, 2014, 11am PST
One common argument against attempts to control sprawl near declining cities is that the problem is the fault of mismanaged city government.
Michael Lewyn
December 9, 2014, 2pm PST
An article on big think examines a project to find the unique qualities of urban street grids as an exercise in the potential of Big Data.
Big Think
Feature
December 8, 2014, 11am PST
Planetizen is pleased to release its list of the ten best books in urban planning, design, and development published in 2014.
James Brasuell
December 2, 2014, 10am PST
In a lengthy discussion shared by Marquette University, author and Harvard Economics Professor Ed Glaeser lays out the thinking behind his book "Triumph of the City," as exemplified by cities around the country and the world.
Medium
November 13, 2014, 2pm PST
A new Pew Charitable Trusts report discusses the ongoing recovery of American cities from the 2008 Great Recession, more than five years after it officially ended.
Bloomberg News
October 22, 2014, 1pm PDT
A study from the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis finds evidence that large, dense metropolitan areas have experienced the most complete recovery following the Great Recession.
CityLab
October 18, 2014, 7am PDT
B Labs, the nonprofit that oversees and assesses B Corps, reports that, compared to other sustainable businesses, B Corps are 68 percent more likely to donate at least 10 percent of their profits to charity.
ICIC
August 27, 2014, 12pm PDT
Pete Saunders, blogger with the Corner Side Yard and professional planning consultant, wrote a post explaining Chicago for the U.K. publication Guardian Cities.
Guardian Cities
August 12, 2014, 2pm PDT
Ben Schulman and Xiaoran Li lead an interesting thought experiment about the populations of cities around the country. That is, what would happen to the population of American cities if all their sizes were standardized?
Belt Magazine
August 10, 2014, 1pm PDT
Jason Fargo follows the announcement that the FBI will soon set up shop outside of the infamous and despised J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington D.C. by listing six buildings that residents of cities "love to hate."
Guardian