Cities

April 26, 2015, 11am PDT
Secretary of State John Kerry recently began a two-year term as the chair of the Acrtic Council. He used the occasion to make a call for a stronger role for cities in international efforts to fight climate change.
The Washington Post
April 14, 2015, 8am PDT
What helps make a downtown family friendly? Safe places to play, safe streets, good schools and attainable housing, writes Jennifer Hill.
Community Builders
February 24, 2015, 2pm PST
For half a century, suburbs surpassed city centers in population and job growth. These economic and demographic trends appear to be reversing. America's cities have grown faster than outlying areas and new research that jobs are coming with them.
Surging City Center Job Growth
December 31, 2014, 9am PST
A post on Gizmodo traces the long and evolving history of defensive fortifications and how they influenced how cities were built and how people lived.
Gizmodo
Feature
December 31, 2014, 5am PST
A deeper look at the traffic data on Planetizen reveals trends from the planning and urban design conversation of 2014.
James Brasuell
Blog post
December 29, 2014, 11am PST
One common argument against attempts to control sprawl near declining cities is that the problem is the fault of mismanaged city government.
Michael Lewyn
December 9, 2014, 2pm PST
An article on big think examines a project to find the unique qualities of urban street grids as an exercise in the potential of Big Data.
Big Think
Feature
December 8, 2014, 11am PST
Planetizen is pleased to release its list of the ten best books in urban planning, design, and development published in 2014.
James Brasuell
December 2, 2014, 10am PST
In a lengthy discussion shared by Marquette University, author and Harvard Economics Professor Ed Glaeser lays out the thinking behind his book "Triumph of the City," as exemplified by cities around the country and the world.
Medium
November 13, 2014, 2pm PST
A new Pew Charitable Trusts report discusses the ongoing recovery of American cities from the 2008 Great Recession, more than five years after it officially ended.
Bloomberg News
October 22, 2014, 1pm PDT
A study from the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis finds evidence that large, dense metropolitan areas have experienced the most complete recovery following the Great Recession.
CityLab
October 18, 2014, 7am PDT
B Labs, the nonprofit that oversees and assesses B Corps, reports that, compared to other sustainable businesses, B Corps are 68 percent more likely to donate at least 10 percent of their profits to charity.
ICIC
August 27, 2014, 12pm PDT
Pete Saunders, blogger with the Corner Side Yard and professional planning consultant, wrote a post explaining Chicago for the U.K. publication Guardian Cities.
Guardian Cities
August 12, 2014, 2pm PDT
Ben Schulman and Xiaoran Li lead an interesting thought experiment about the populations of cities around the country. That is, what would happen to the population of American cities if all their sizes were standardized?
Belt Magazine
August 10, 2014, 1pm PDT
Jason Fargo follows the announcement that the FBI will soon set up shop outside of the infamous and despised J Edgar Hoover Building in Washington D.C. by listing six buildings that residents of cities "love to hate."
Guardian
July 29, 2014, 11am PDT
The results of a survey commissioned by Sasaki Associates reveal key insights into what makes cities great for those who love them, as well as where planners and urban designers should focus their efforts in improving the urban experience.
ASLA The Dirt
Blog post
July 8, 2014, 5am PDT
The most transit-oriented metro areas often have lower levels of traffic congestion than one might expect based on their size.
Michael Lewyn
April 18, 2014, 7am PDT
A new report finds that suburban areas are losing residents to urban areas like New York City and Washington D.C., even well past the point when people would have traditionally made the choice to return to the suburbs.
New York Times
March 30, 2014, 1pm PDT
The 5,000 local ordinances that prohibit “annoyances” often focus on the fraught intersections of the public and private. And it’s probably no surprise that public employees often seek legal protections from annoying (or annoyed) citizens.
The Wall Street Journal
March 28, 2014, 11am PDT
For the second installment in a five-part series on economic segregation in U.S. metros, Richard Florida examines the cities where poverty stays most hidden from "everyone else."
Atlantic Cities