Japan

July 24, 2012, 2pm PDT
Transportation planners who thought the current job climate couldn't possibly get worse may want to ignore this piece. John Metcalfe reports on studies that show slime is just as effective in planning the path of an urban rail system as humans.
The Atlantic Cities
May 18, 2012, 1pm PDT
As a New Yorker visiting Tokyo, Eric Jaffe set out to keep a scorecard comparing his home city's transportation infrastructure with that of the Japanese capital. He found that the score wasn't even close.
The Atlantic Cities
May 13, 2012, 11am PDT
ASLA's blog, <em>The Dirt</em>, dishes on how sushi, an ancient food, became modern in Tokyo, and conquered the world.
THE DIRT
April 24, 2012, 5am PDT
Japan was not the only nation to shutter its nuclear power plants after the March 11, 2011 Fukushima earthquake and tsunami. Germany followed suit. Consequently, both nations have seen a dramatic increase in coal burning, thus increasing emissions.
Los Angeles Times
March 21, 2012, 12pm PDT
In light of the recent controversy surrounding the Eisenhower Memorial in Washington DC, and observations from a recent trip to Japan, Christopher Hawthorne pens an opinion piece on memorials - the "eternally fraught corner of design practice.
Los Angeles Times
March 9, 2012, 2pm PST
Ever wanted to silence aggressive cell phone talkers or that intractable opponent speaking out against your brilliant redevelopment plan? Well researchers in Japan have developed just the product for you, reports Mark Hachman.
PCMag.com
March 9, 2012, 1pm PST
Christopher Hawthorne reports from Japan on the many obstacles preventing areas destroyed by the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami from proceeding with rebuilding, as the recovery effort stalls in the cleanup stage.
Los Angeles Times
March 9, 2012, 5am PST
A series of stunning photo comparisons in <em>The Washington Post</em> and <em>The New York Times</em> document the magnitude of destruction unleashed by the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and the steps achieved to date towards recovery.
The Washington Post
March 6, 2012, 11am PST
Having just returned from a United Nations-led tour of disaster-ravaged areas of Japan, Warren Karlenzig reports on efforts across the region to rebuild along smart growth and green economic development models.
Common Current
February 11, 2012, 7am PST
Over the past 100 years, women-only train cars have come and gone in Japan. Daniel Krieger reports on why these subway cars have endured amongst women’s concerns for safety.
The Atlantic Cities
February 7, 2012, 5am PST
The new exhibit at Toyko's Mori Art Museum will be the first architecture showcase since the 2011 earthquake, and displays a movement central to the country's history of building and rebuilding.
The New York Times
January 11, 2012, 6am PST
Since the Japanese government spent $300 billion rebuilding Okushiri after a 1993 tsunami, things have taken a grim, ironic turn: with high-paying construction jobs leaving, so are young people who no longer wish to be part of a fishing economy.
The New York Times
August 23, 2011, 10am PDT
Japanese officials recently approved plans to build a 320-mile magnetic levitation train system. The $114 billion project is expected to begin construction in 2014.
Ecomagination
June 28, 2011, 12pm PDT
In preparing a bid to host the 2020 Olympics, Tokyo is planning to include areas that were ravaged by the recent tsunami and earthquake.
Daily Mail
June 24, 2011, 5am PDT
Tsunami, earthquakes, and nuclear radiation in the past, Japan proceeds to build a magnetic train that defies Newton's laws of physics.
GOOD Magazine
June 19, 2011, 11am PDT
Japan is typically associated with strong disaster preparedness plans, but the devastation following the March tsunami highlights some of the nation's shortcomings in adapting and reacting, according to this piece from <em>Citiwire</em>.
Citiwire
June 11, 2011, 5am PDT
A small community in tsunami-ravaged Japan considers a plan to move the entire village farther above sea level.
MSNBC
June 6, 2011, 9am PDT
Panasonic and a group of companies are planning on building a new demonstration "smart town" in Kanagawa Prefecture on a site the tsunami destroyed.
Popular Science
May 31, 2011, 10am PDT
After decades in development, Japan is ready to begin construction on their first commercial maglev train, which will eventually run between Tokyo and Osaka at speeds of up to 313 miles per hour.
Environment Service News
May 23, 2011, 10am PDT
A look at the pedestrian scramble in the Shibuya District of Tokyo, Japan.
LA Times