Richard Florida

November 7, 2017, 11am PST
Overall, the value of American land is strikingly high. But it's the differences between and within cities that concern Florida.
CityLab
Blog post
September 28, 2017, 8am PDT
Critiquing Richard Florida's claim that "the urban revival is over."
Michael Lewyn
June 5, 2017, 6am PDT
A PBS NewsHour two-fer: an interview of urbanologist Richard Florida conducted in a walking tour of New York's famed High Line in the gentrifying West Chelsea neighborhood, a fitting backdrop for his new book, "The New Urban Crisis."
PBS NewsHour
Blog post
May 2, 2017, 5am PDT
In his new book, Richard Florida worries about segregation and redefines "the creative class."
Michael Lewyn
April 24, 2017, 6am PDT
Richard Florida writes that Trump's victory over Hillary Clinton is a product of the backlash against what he calls The New Urban Crisis of burgeoning economic inequality—the widening divides between rich and poor.
Penn IUR Urban Link
April 20, 2017, 9am PDT
Richard Florida was right about everything, except when he wasn't. Ben Brown brings us up to speed on the Creative Class.
PlaceShakers
April 17, 2017, 7am PDT
"Vive le difference!" reads the rallying cry if an article co-authored by Richard Florida and Joel Kotkin.
The Daily Beast
February 13, 2017, 2pm PST
One of the most enthusiastic advocates for the urban resurgence, Richard Florida turns his attention to the segregation, inequality, and housing shortages that threaten to tear cities apart in The New Urban Crisis.
California Planning & Development Report
November 29, 2016, 6am PST
In the election's wake, Richard Florida compiles some telling statistics on the nation's threatened middle class. It's on the decline, yes, but it's also becoming more segregated into certain cities, often in the Sunbelt and Rust Belt.
CityLab
October 25, 2016, 10am PDT
Call it the re-education, the evolution, or the contrition of Richard Florida, but the "rock-star urbanist" has realized some unintended consequences of his creative class ethos, and he's ready to share a new vision for cities.
Houston Chronicle
October 8, 2016, 9am PDT
Florida discusses a recent study that emphasizes how new the back-to-the-city movement is, how white it is, and what that means for the people it pushes out.
CityLab
August 3, 2016, 12pm PDT
In the latest news, chemical company Chemours will remain in downtown Wilmington, Delaware's largest city. In June, McDonald's decamped from Chicago's suburbs for downtown. This latest corporate trend is the topic of a New York Times article.
The New York Times
Blog post
June 21, 2016, 6am PDT
It’s difficult to grow a city. Tax revenues limit budgets and there are trade-offs involved in how to spend those resources. Any city trying to allocate resources to grow needs to know who moves.
Casey Brazeal
June 7, 2016, 10am PDT
Without children at the center of activity, the urban neighborhoods of today offer little compared to the ideals expressed by Jane Jacobs, according to this strongly worded critique of contemporary urbanism.
The American Conservative
January 27, 2016, 12pm PST
Penn IUR Faculty Fellows and Scholars weigh in on the 2016 Presidential election. What urban issues should the candidates be focusing on?
PennIUR
May 19, 2015, 5am PDT
Richard Florida discusses a study comparing the neighborhoods that house "creative" industries. Science and tech tends to favor low-density office parks, while arts and cultural industries prefer mixed-use urban districts.
CityLab
May 14, 2015, 11am PDT
As the world's cities grow ever larger, local governments constantly ask themselves which is better: amalgamating into one metro-wide government, or maintaining autonomy among fragmented jurisdictions? The answer remains unclear.
The Guardian
March 19, 2015, 6am PDT
Commentators often say an influx of wealth is transforming American cities. But if prosperity is really still suburban, what are the consequences for the environment?
Grist
October 22, 2014, 1pm PDT
A study from the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis finds evidence that large, dense metropolitan areas have experienced the most complete recovery following the Great Recession.
CityLab
August 5, 2014, 7am PDT
A recent post by Richard Florida, working in partnership with the Martin Prosperity Institute, examines where (and how much) income inequality grew in U.S. metros between 2006 and 2012.
CityLab