Transportation

Blog post
April 29, 2014, 9pm PDT
The biggest mobility challenge in cities isn't about what comes out of a car's tailpipe - it's about the massive amount of space that cars demand. Space to drive in, and space to park in. When explaining this, these pictures are worth 1000 words.
Brent Toderian
Blog post
April 15, 2014, 7am PDT
Medellín has been called the most innovative city in the world, and recently hosted the World Urban Forum WUF7 to huge acclaim. It has taken back the city's public realm, found simple solutions to complex problems, and emphasized a "City for Life."
Brent Toderian
March 30, 2014, 9am PDT
Los Angeles Councilmember Mike Bonin talks mobility on the Westside and the region. With another transportation sales tax extension in the works, Bonin sees a sunny future for LA, but no easy fix to end congestion.
The Planning Report
Blog post
February 3, 2014, 4am PST
A minor word of caution on statistical inference and the stories it can tell
Norman Wright
January 26, 2014, 11am PST
People have been driving about 1% less per year for the last 9 years. What can public-private partnerships for transportation alternatives do to stoke this fire?
PlaceShakers
Blog post
January 20, 2014, 6am PST
Last week, the Transportation Research Board held its annual conference with < 10,000 people in attendance. We analyzed the tweets to generate a list of the hottest topics, links to transportation resources, and most influential people.
Jennifer Evans-Cowley
Blog post
June 3, 2013, 5pm PDT
Shutting down cities as a response to terrorism makes such violence more rewarding and thus more tempting.
Michael Lewyn
May 25, 2013, 9am PDT
While much of the current discussion in planning centers on decreasing road capacity to promote greater pedestrian mobility, Eric Jaffe wonders if we are thinking enough about the critical and complex task of moving freight.
The Atlantic Cities
January 2, 2013, 5am PST
The proposal is simple. Instead of investing billions of dollars more on elaborate infrastructure or trust a corrupted police force, the concept is to nudge this complex system at two targeted points in the city, argues Mitchell Sutika Sipus.
Humanitarian Space
Blog post
November 18, 2012, 6pm PST
Even in cities without world-class transit systems, transit can reduce car ownership to some extent.
Michael Lewyn
November 5, 2012, 10am PST
A controversial Virginia ballot measure to limit eminent domain use has gone without much notice. Michael Rodriguez, a local transportation planner, argues against this measure.
Greater Greater Washington
November 3, 2012, 5am PDT
Some highway advocates in the suburbs surrounding Washington, DC think that building an outer Beltway through Northern Virginia will be beneficial to the planet. Others disagree.
Greater Greater Washington
September 26, 2012, 1pm PDT
Critic Michael Kimmelman, fresh back from Louisville's Idea Festival, questions why that quickly emerging city wants to double down on a new freeway expansion through its downtown while other progressive cities are tearing theirs down.
New York Times
Blog post
August 27, 2012, 11am PDT

For those following the intense debate over intercity passenger rail in the US, the following recent news items might have a few planners scratching their heads:

Samuel Staley
August 16, 2012, 7am PDT
As the new federal transportation bill, known as MAP-21, moves to the implementation stage, major finding decisions will ride on the nuances by which the U.S. DOT defines and measures "congestion," "roadway performance," and "cost effectiveness".
Streetsblog Capitol Hill
August 9, 2012, 5am PDT
Congressman Earl Blumenauer of Portland, Oregon and LA County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky discuss the recently signed federal transportation bill, whether it's a sound policy, and how it may impact local government and transportation initiatives.
The Planning Report
July 25, 2012, 9am PDT
Winnie Hu reports on how the reopening of the 65th Street Rail Yard in Brooklyn last week is part of a wider, regional rail expansion effort that aims to revive the moribund industry in order to boost economic and environmental benefits.
The New York Times
January 10, 2012, 7am PST
Jerry Brown has proposed a huge governmental streamlining to make the state more efficient. But in the process he is proposing separating transportation and housing -- now housed in one agency -- and putting them in separate agencies.
California Planning & Development Report
December 13, 2011, 10am PST
In Wisconsin, taxpayers pay roughly $779 per household for roads and $50 for transit. But most drivers still believe that transit is subsidized and roads pay for themselves, writes Tanya Snyder.
Streetsblog Capitol Hill
December 12, 2011, 7am PST
They mayor of Troy, Mich. chooses ideology over investment, <em>The Atlantic's</em> says Eric Jaffe.
The Atlantic