Architecture

June 3, 2008, 11am PDT
French President Sarkozy's call for 'audacious' plans for a Paris of the future has been answered by some of the world's top architects and designers, but some wonder how any of the plans can work within the constraints of the existing city.
The Globe & Mail
June 3, 2008, 7am PDT
<p>In expectation of a new exhibit opening at the Whitney Museum of Art, the New Yorker reflects on the curious life and career of Buckminster Fuller.</p>
The New Yorker
May 30, 2008, 1pm PDT
<p>At the World Science Festival in New York, visions of future cities mix the usual Blade Runner-esque architecture with abundant greenery.</p>
May 26, 2008, 5am PDT
<p>The Pentagon Memorial, dedicated to the 194 people killed at the Pentagon on Sept. 11th, opened today to families and journalists. Architects Julie Beckman and Keith Kaseman sought to evoke individual memories but express a collective whole.</p>
WJLA-TV
May 24, 2008, 11am PDT
<p>If you demolish a building, then recreate it exactly in a different spot, will it retain its original character? Atlantans may find out.</p>
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Blog post
April 21, 2008, 12pm PDT

Many viewers may not fully appreciate movies as a visual story-telling medium, but that fact came home to me dramatically the other night while watching “Juno,” the off beat, smart and funny film that just snagged a best screenplay Oscar. The deliberate use of architecture and public spaces, in particular, was quite effective although you probably won’t find these references in plot summaries or synopses.

Samuel Staley
Blog post
September 4, 2007, 11am PDT

This Labor Day weekend, Southern California is facing an extreme heat wave, with temperatures soaring well above 100 degrees. Air conditioners have to work overtime to keep indoor temperatures near 80, and California power resources are operating at near capacity. As condominiums bake in the sun (as they do most of the year around here), there is not a solar panel in sight.

While we are still waiting for renewable energy, a few simple measures could lead to big residential power savings. Enter the laundry line, one of the oldest and most practical ways to use solar energy. Electric clothes dryers not only require vast amounts of fossil fuel-derived power, they also pour heat into living spaces and strain cooling systems.

Diana DeRubertis
Blog post
June 9, 2007, 7am PDT

Some people choose to work in planning because they see it as a relatively interesting and stable job. Others have dreams of being the equivalent of an all-powerful SimCity-style mayor. However, many choose planning as a career because they want to make a difference in the world. They want to do good and to help those who are the least advantaged. They are attracted by the potential, if limited, for planning to foster environmental justice and social equity.

Ann Forsyth
Blog post
April 23, 2007, 11am PDT

Last week, my home city, Los Angeles, lost out to Chicago for the right to represent the United States in the international competition to host the 2016 Olympics.  Since an Olympic city selection represents the ultimate inter-urban beauty contest – dare I say, a kind of urban “International Idol” – what did this process tell us about the state of urban planning in two of America’s largest cities? 

Ken Bernstein
Blog post
April 20, 2007, 2pm PDT

This post is a few weeks after the fact but the recent APA conference only solidified my resolution to say something.  In early April Teddy Cruz gave a lecture here in Philly at the School of Design.  For those of you not familiar with his work, he has a unique and thoughtful perspective on the relationships between culture, planning and design. 

Scott Page
Blog post
April 17, 2007, 11am PDT

In my hometown—and yours, too, I'm sure—a small, one-story house was for sale, and then it was gone. The guy who bought it promptly tore it down and then, because the new house he had designed was too big for the site, let the hole sit there for a year, a broken tooth in the 1950s neighborhood. Of course, the house he built was still too big for the lot, but there it stands, three feet from his seething neighbors: a McMansion.

Margaret Foster
Blog post
February 22, 2007, 5am PST

As a note of introduction, I am a Master's student in Community Planning at the University of Maryland. I'm happy to be part of this exciting project.

MLK Memorial Library, Washington, D.C.With a series of new urban libraries opening in U.S. cities recent years, its been said we're living through an 'urban library renaissance.' Whether it is the enthusiastic reception of the new Seattle library, or lending and attendance up in urban Canadian libraries, there seems to be an increased awareness of the critical role libraries play, even in the information age.

However, no such renaissance has happened here in Washington, D.C. -- at least not yet. Here the former mayor's plans to build a new library were stalled by what the Washington Post has termed the 'Mies Mystique.'

Robert Goodspeed
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