Population Growth

November 16, 2014, 1pm PST
More people translates to more emissions, right? Cut back on population growth and you'll reduce emissions and the threat of climate change, along with other environmental woes—it's a no-brainer. Or is it?
The Washington Post - Wonkblog
November 11, 2014, 8am PST
When China relaxed its rigid one-child policy last November, health officials were expecting an additional two million births to result. As of Sept. 30, they have received only 804,000 applications from eligible couples.
The Wall Street Journal
October 10, 2014, 10am PDT
According to the latest figures from the U.S. Census 2013 American Community Survey (ACS), Americans continue to move into cities en masse over suburbs, but certain cities are attracting larger crowds than others.
USA Today
October 6, 2014, 9am PDT
"A new report out of Rutgers University reveals that since 2010, the fringes of the New York region have lost population as the core has grown," according to an article by Stephen Miller.
StreetsBlog NYC
September 12, 2014, 2pm PDT
The growth of Seattle growth is inflaming passions on either side of the issue—some claim that the city wants everyone to "live in cubicles"; others say the city isn't doing enough to prepare for 120,000 expected new residents.
Seattle Weekly
September 4, 2014, 12pm PDT
Joel Kotkin explores the small cities that are growing the fastest in the United States, and what factors lead to this growth.
Forbes
August 30, 2014, 5am PDT
In the midst of a building boom and expecting another 1.4 million residents to live in the city by 2031, London is embroiled in a debate about how it should meet housing demands.
New York Times
August 28, 2014, 5am PDT
Plan 2040 is the Atlanta region's plan to accommodate about 3 million new residents in the next 25 years. A new survey is looking for feedback about just how the region should approach that staggering growth.
Curbed Atlanta
August 12, 2014, 12pm PDT
An influx of new residents has also meant an influx of residential parking passes in the Southie neighborhood of Boston. Can a pilot program to extend residential parking restrictions (from four nights a week to seven) quell the "crisis"?
The Boston Globe
July 17, 2014, 12pm PDT
Jens Manual Krogstad provides historical context for the migration to oil boom jobs in North Dakota by comparing the current "man rush" to the silver rush in late 1800s Colorado and the Alaskan oil boom of the 1970s.
Pew Research Center
July 1, 2014, 5am PDT
Jed Kolko analyzes 2013 population estimates by age group for counties—the U.S. Census released the data late last week.
Trulia Trends Blog
June 27, 2014, 2pm PDT
The visualization has something for everyone: a colorful visualization of population trends for the data geeks, a vintage look and feel for the hipsters, and the competitive aspect of comparing cities to each other for everyone else.
CityLab
June 9, 2014, 11am PDT
Houston's incredible rate of growth since 2000 has created a demographic and economic milieu that presents a unique set of challenges, and potential, that is often ignored by federal policies.
Urban Institute
June 2, 2014, 5am PDT
In this opinion piece, Brookings demographer William H. Frey looks at three years of census data and discusses whether urban growth will stay through the decade or whether the U.S. will return to its traditional, post-War suburban growth patterns.
Brookings
May 26, 2014, 5am PDT
Urban growth is slowing and suburban and beyond growth is increasing according to this Wall Street Journal article. But wait—didn’t we just post an article from Governing that concluded just the opposite from the same Census data released May 22?
The Wall Street Journal
May 23, 2014, 12pm PDT
It's hard to avoid tales about the country's urban boom; then the U.S. Census goes and releases data that totally backs it up.
Governing
May 21, 2014, 12pm PDT
Austin has experienced spectacular rates of growth in recent decades, growing by more than 20 percent between 2000 and 2010. Among quickly growing cities, however, Austin was the only that also saw a decline in African-American population.
KUT
May 5, 2014, 2pm PDT
A growing population and drought across the West is leading some experts to call for changes in the way governments and utilities charge for water. The difference between the way Tucson and Phoenix, for instance charge for water, is striking.
Cronkite News
April 14, 2014, 12pm PDT
After a decade of incredible growth, a tightening job market has finally slowed the domestic migration into Washington D.C.
Washington Post
April 13, 2014, 11am PDT
An article on the Metro Trends Blog finds that data do not support the common narrative that young people are moving to cities in huge numbers. Most cities, according to the study, lost more adults aged 20-35 than they gained between 2000 and 2012.
Metro Trends