Irvin Dawid's picture
Correspondent
Member for
 11 years
Contributed
 2,812 posts

Irvin Dawid discovered Planetizen when a classmate in an urban planning lab at San Jose State University shared it with him in 2003. When he left San Jose State that year, he took with him an interest in Planetizen, if not the master's degree in urban & regional planning.

As a long-time environmental activist, he formed the Sustainable Land Use committee for his local Sierra Club chapter and served six years on the Bay Area Air Quality Management District’s Advisory Council from 2002-2008. He maintains his interest in air quality by representing Sierra Club California on the Clean Air Dialogue, a working group of the Calif. Environmental Dialog representing business, regulatory and public health/environmental interests.

Major interests include transportation funding, e.g. gas taxes, VMT fees, and road tolls, and energy subsidies that lead to unlevel playing fields for more sustainable choices.

He hails from Queens (Bayside) and Long Island (Great Neck); received an AAS in Fisheries & Wildlife Technology from SUNY Cobleskill and a B.S. from what is now Excelsior College.

After residing for three years on California’s North Coast, he’s lived on the San Francisco Peninsula for since 1983, including 24 years in Palo Alto. Home is now near downtown Burlingame, a short bike-ride to the Caltrain station.

He’s been car-free since driving his 1972 Dodge Tradesman maxi-van, his means to exit Long Island in 1979, to the junkyard in 1988.

Major forms of transportation: A 1991 'citybike' and monthly Caltrain pass, zone 2-2. "It's no LIRR, but it may be the most bike friendly train in America."

Irvin can be reached at irvindawid@gmail.com

Recent Posts

Yesterday
Within ten years, passengers flying on JetBlue out of JFK will leaving a much lower carbon footprint, thanks to a fuel composed of 30 percent biofuel.
The New York Times
2 days ago
Lego-type housing construction has attracted the attention of two separate developers as an efficient means to provide housing for the city's large homeless population but has met objections from labor unions and the Mayor's Office.
San Francisco Chronicle
3 days ago
Environmental advocacy is not enough. Environmental and social justice must play a role in California's legislative effort to battle climate change, opine two professors from UC Berkeley and USC in the San Francisco Chronicle.
San Francisco Chronicle
4 days ago
The rupture reveals the hazards of pipelines, but also shows how important they are to the economy. Six governors declared states of emergency to deal with gasoline shortages resulting from the pipeline shutdown in Shelby County, Alabama.
The Huntsville Times
5 days ago
A largely revenue-neutral carbon tax proposal, similar to the carbon tax in British Columbia which began in 2008, qualified for the November ballot in Washington. Environmentalists and Democrats, not Big Oil, may cause it's defeat.
Crosscut
5 days ago
The light rail extension opened May 20 and is already 70 percent toward meeting its 2030 ridership projection. According to a survey conducted in June by Metro, more than two-thirds of riders were new to the Expo Line.
KPCC
6 days ago
The state's unique Clean Air Rule is called 'cap-and-reduce.' Businesses that fall under the cap are required to reduce emissions, just like California's cap-and-trade program. However, they can not be forced to purchase carbon credits.
Crosscut
September 16, 2016, 10am PDT
Research from BuildZoom, a San Francisco-based contractors' website, shows that housing affordability increases with a region's ability to build outwards, as opposed to upwards. Densification largely has not accompanied efforts to curb sprawl.
The Wall Street Journal
September 16, 2016, 7am PDT
Voters in six Bay Area cities in four Bay Area counties will determine the outcome of eight ballot measures on rent and eviction control. Two of the cities will have city council-sponsored measures competing against voter initiatives.
San Francisco Chronicle
September 14, 2016, 12pm PDT
Since transportation agencies decided to make carpool lanes available for non-carpoolers (toll-paying solo drivers or electric vehicles), they've become congested in some metro areas, which can violate federal conditions on their use.
Stateline