United States

May 26, 2016, 2pm PDT
Turning 100 the same year as New York's first Zoning Code? The National Park Service, of course. The momentous occasion is likely to find the parks more popular than ever.
FiveThirtyEight
May 26, 2016, 1pm PDT
Numerous popular and academic writers from the 1950s and 1960s critiqued suburban development patterns and found them wanting.
Curbed
May 26, 2016, 8am PDT
Recent data from Trulia reveals that the number of homes worth at least million dollars doubled in the past four years. Some places have a veritable monopoly on ritzy domiciles.
Quartz
May 25, 2016, 2pm PDT
Hospitals, medical research centers, and the like are supposed to represent health, but are often an unappealing and monolithic presence in the urban landscape. How can the form of health centers fall in line with their function?
The Brookings Institution
May 25, 2016, 1pm PDT
Washington, D.C. has many great museums. One of its least known may be the most interesting to architects, planners, builders, and others. The National Building Museum is all about the built environment.
UrbDeZine
May 25, 2016, 12pm PDT
In light of the resignation of APTA's president following the withdrawal of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority, the Transit Center offers its recommendations for reforming the national transit advocacy organization.
Transit Center
May 25, 2016, 10am PDT
The planning world celebrated Jane Jacobs's 100th birthday earlier this month, and has already begun commemorating the centennial of New York's first zoning code. But did you know regional planning rose to prominence 50 years ago?
MZ Strategies
May 25, 2016, 5am PDT
A Pew Research Center analysis of Census Data reveals a fundamental shift in the way U.S. residents are living—last true in a time closer to the Civil War than the 20th century.
Pew Research Center
May 24, 2016, 2pm PDT
The cause of infrastructure should be easy for people, and planners, to rally behind. But infrastructure's cause, like so many other political issues, invites conflicts of interest.
Streetsblog USA
May 24, 2016, 10am PDT
Call them crashes, collisions, even incidents, just don't call them 'accidents,' emphatically states Mark R. Rosekind, Ph.D., Administrator for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), the nation's premier traffic safety agency.
The New York Times
May 24, 2016, 8am PDT
In Mach, Uber launched Passport, a service allowing cross-border service from San Diego to any location in the northern Baja California region. A columnist's experiment with the service reveals more PR effort than mobility service.
Los Angeles Times
May 24, 2016, 6am PDT
As the debate about whether people prefer to live in the suburbs or the big city rages on, data from the U.S. Census reveals a clear preference on the part of economic trends in the wake of the Great Recession.
The Washington Post
May 23, 2016, 12pm PDT
New York's 1916 zoning code would not have allowed 40 percent of buildings in Manhattan to be built today, according to a recent analysis. It also turns 100 on August 27 of this year.
New York Times
May 23, 2016, 8am PDT
Rail has transformed the Mile-High City, and the new University of Colorado A Line from Union Station to the airport is but one of many lines that has turned Denver one of the nation's fastest growing and attractive cities. And more lines are coming!
Politico Magazine
May 23, 2016, 7am PDT
Benjamin Ross argues that the walk signal is a fundamentally flawed approach to creating walkable streets and shareable roadways—making walking slower, less convenient, and more dangerous.
Greater Greater Washington
May 23, 2016, 6am PDT
Community-supported agriculture (CSA) programs originally let local buyers support local growers. But with a rise in subscription-based "food box" clubs, it's getting harder to say what a real CSA looks like.
philly.com
May 22, 2016, 5am PDT
The share of homes with values topping $1 million rose from 1.6 percent to 3 percent nationwide between 2012 and 2016.
Marketplace
May 20, 2016, 10am PDT
An estimated 5 million Native Americans lived in the area that would become the United States when Christopher Columbus arrived in 1492. After reaching a low in the late 19th century, the Native American population has almost fully recovered.
Get Data
May 20, 2016, 8am PDT
Pedal Fort Collins explains the math used to calculate the impacts of various sized vehicles on the roads they travel.
Pedal Fort Collins
May 20, 2016, 7am PDT
Perhaps no development is more associated with the presumptive Republican presidential nominee than Trump Towers, which established his reputation as a developer with little regard for historic preservation and revealed his character in business.
Planetizen