New Mexico

June 9, 2011, 8am PDT
Mogro is a new for-profit company in New Mexico that is targeting neighborhoods with little access to healthy food with temperature-controlled grocery trucks.
GOOD Magazine
April 25, 2011, 6am PDT
It's at Albuquerque's edge, it's the size of Manhattan, and it's happening, despite drought, recession and tightening state budgets. An annotation of Mesa del Sol's master plan explains how and why.
High Country News
December 20, 2010, 6am PST
Physicist Geoffrey West of the Santa Fe Institute applied his talents to unraveling urban issues like population growth in a similar vein that he did earlier with biology. He found answers that explain how all cities work if enough data is supplied.
The New York Times - Magazine
August 4, 2010, 8am PDT
The Albuquerque City Council and staff are drafting plans for Volcano Heights, Volcano Cliffs and Volcano Trails, three sites bordering Petroglyph National Monument. A simmering debate over open space conservation seems cooled by public process.
Albuquerque Journal
July 1, 2010, 5am PDT
This piece from <em>Next American City</em> looks at pollution in small town New Mexico and how court rulings have made it hard for a local organization -- and those in other communities -- to fight environmental battles.
Next American City
April 20, 2010, 5am PDT
A mesa in New Mexico is home to nearly 400 people, which makes up one of the largest communities of people in the U.S. living almost completely off the grid.
The New York Times
December 14, 2009, 9am PST

Despite geologic barriers and in the face of scientific advice, huge infrastructure projects of the 20th century brought water to the arid Southwest and fueled the growth of a megaregion.

Nate Berg
October 7, 2009, 5am PDT
Every year, residents in Santa Fe, New Mexico send a huge human effigy into flames. Burning with it are physical representations of the bad memories and experiences of the past year.
Los Angeles Times
September 21, 2009, 7am PDT
The zoning code of Alamogordo, NM hasn't been revisited since April of 1950. Today, the zoning rewrite group is finally updating the code and making the switch to a form-based code in the process.
Alamogordo Daily News
July 21, 2009, 6am PDT
Small towns in New Mexico are increasingly being used as film locations. But for some locals, the invasion of Hollywood is not worth the economic benefits.
Los Angeles Times
July 13, 2009, 8am PDT
Officials in New Mexico, Colorado and Texas are pooling efforts to try to secure federal funding for a high speed rail link between their urban areas.
The Houston Chronicle
June 30, 2009, 8am PDT
Two new laws in Colorado make legal the formerly prohibited act of collecting rainwater. Other states aren't so lenient.
The New York Times
September 11, 2008, 10am PDT
Albuquerque's new "form-based codes" could offer city planners another model for denser, more pedestrian-friendly growth.
The New Mexico Independent
August 12, 2008, 10am PDT
This column from Neal Peirce looks at the new megapolitan stronghold of the Intermountain West.
February 22, 2008, 8am PST
<p>Restoration and preservation of historic sites along Route 66 are slow going in Albuquerque.</p>
The Albuquerque Tribune
February 15, 2008, 10am PST
<p>Criticism of New Mexico's commuter rail system heats up as officials claim Rail Runner starves other transportation projects of funding.</p>
Associated Press
January 15, 2008, 6am PST
<p>"Sky islands" are a globally unique convergence — the north-south overlap of two major cordilleras spanning the temperate and subtropical latitudes, covering some 40 distinct mountain ranges in the southwestern U.S. But they are at risk.</p> A Journal of the Built & Natural Environments
December 10, 2007, 1pm PST
<p>The seven western states dependent on the Colorado River for their water are on the verge of coming to an agreement on a management plan to ensure a steady supply of water from the increasingly stressed source. But some say the plan won't do enough.</p>
The Arizona Republic
October 5, 2007, 7am PDT
<p>A commuter rail project in Sante Fe is stressing New Mexico's state transportation budget, causing officials to announce delays on many road and highway projects. But many are upset that the rail plans will move ahead unhindered.</p>
The Albuquerque Tribune
September 18, 2007, 1pm PDT
<p>Rapid development is expected to bring the population of Albuquerque, New Mexico, over the 1 million mark within 15 years.</p>
The Albuquerque Tribune