District of Columbia

A new study finds evidence of a causal link between bikeshare and congestion in Washington, D.C.
3 days ago   Resources for the Future
Owners of rowhouse properties in Washington D.C. will no longer be able to add height and density by building pop-ups. The construction provoked the ire of aesthetically minded critics and, now, the regulatory controls of the District's zoning code.
Jun 10, 2015   The Washington Post
Washington D.C. must wrap up its consideration of the 2015 International Building Code by July. Adoption of the IBC could enable new types of density in the nation's capital.
Jun 3, 2015   Greater Greater Washington
With their reputation for decent schools, lower crime, and affordable housing, suburbs can be an attractive prospect for young families. Can cities retain that demographic? Should they?
May 16, 2015   The Washington Post
Aaron Wiener interviews Polly Donaldson—the recently hired head the Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) in Washington, D.C.—about her strategies for improving housing in the Nation's Capital.
May 16, 2015   Washington City Paper
D.C.'s fast-growing downtown neighborhoods have new restaurants, offices and apartments—but few playgrounds. With thousands of children expected to be born in the District in the next five years, where will they all play?
May 5, 2015   Elevation DC
In anticipation of the expected opening of the H Street/Benning Road streetcar line in Washington, D.C., Peter Dovak examines the evolution of streetcar planning over the past 20 years.
May 5, 2015   Greater Greater Washington
A Republican spending bill would slash funding for the D.C. Metro by half. Local Democrats have called the proposal shortsighted and ill timed.
Apr 30, 2015   The Hill
The diversity gap between the population of Washington, D.C. and the membership of its model bikeshare system is well established, but it's also getting worse.
Apr 30, 2015   The Washington Post
While transit ridership is up around the country, the D.C. Metro has experienced the opposite. The agency's planners aren't worried about those numbers, though. They're excited about development that's bringing more residents to transit-served areas.
Apr 30, 2015   The Washington Post
In the wealthy community of Spring Valley, just inside the western boundaries of the District of Columbia, residents are opposing a proposed development by claiming the site—a parking lot—is a historic landmark.
Apr 17, 2015   Washington City Paper