Daniel Burnham

Rank: 
6

Daniel Burnham was an Amer­i­can architect and urban planner. He was the Di­rec­tor of Works for the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago and de­signed sev­eral fa­mous build­ings, in­clud­ing the Flatiron Building in New York City and Union Station in Wash­ing­ton D.C.

Beginning in 1906 and pub­lished in 1909, Burn­ham and as­sis­tant Edward H. Bennett pre­pared The Plan of Chicago, which laid out plans for the fu­ture of the city. It was the first com­pre­hen­sive plan for the con­trolled growth of an Amer­i­can city, and an out­growth of the City Beau­ti­ful movement. The plan in­cluded am­bi­tious pro­pos­als for the lake­front and river and de­clared that ev­ery cit­i­zen should be within walk­ing dis­tance of a park. Spon­sored by the Commercial Club of Chicago, Burn­ham do­nated his ser­vices in hopes of fur­ther­ing his own cause.