Technology

The increasing use of online civic engagement platforms offers a chance for planners to improve the planning process—that is, if they take full advantage of the opportunities presented by the new technology to showcase their expertise. Exclusive
Yesterday  By Karin Brandt
Recent reports reveal that a Chinese Internet search company known as Baidu is developing a bicycle that will ride itself. The technology could be game changer in Asia—China, for instance, has 551 million bike riders.
Jul 11, 2014   Tech In Asia
While much of the concern of how to regulate transportation network companies like Uber, Lyft, and Sidecar comes down to questions about safety and access, recent findings show that the apps have reduced DUI arrests in the City of Brotherly Love.
Jul 9, 2014   PlanPhilly
If you're obsessed with trivia and maps, prepare to lose some hours.
Jul 4, 2014   CityLab
Ted Trautman provides a thorough investigation of the actions (or lack thereof) of transportation network companies to provide access for customers with special needs.
Jul 3, 2014   Next City
Conceived as a counterpoint to the "smart city," the "playable city" would think beyond efficiency and utility in applying technology to the urban experience.
Jun 30, 2014   Next City
Want to know the fastest way to get where you're going? You Are Here has created a new visualization tool that shows you the fastest mode for your trip in 11 cities.
Jun 28, 2014   You Are Here
Writing for The Atlantic, Adrienne LaFrance details how the bicycle paved the way for many liberating political advancement for women.
Jun 27, 2014   The Atlantic
My 16 year old daughter is in China for three weeks, traveling with 14 classmates on a language and cultural exchange. Opinion
Jun 26, 2014   By Lisa Feldstein
The 596 Acres project to catalogue and improve vacant, publicly owned lots in New York City produced another great tool called the Urban Reviewer, which gathers all of New York's adopted neighborhood master plans in one place.
Jun 25, 2014   CityLab
A "cease-and-desist letter" was sent June 23 to MonkeyParking, a Rome-based tech startup that developed and markets an app that allows motorists to auction public parking spaces beginning at $5. The city attorney demanded shut-down by July 11.
Jun 25, 2014   San Francisco Chronicle