Accessibility

April 13, 2016, 8am PDT
Environmental groups are split over legislation that would remove the nationwide ban on bicycles in the wild.
The Oregonian
Blog post
February 23, 2016, 10am PST
Do modern accessibility regulations go far enough to ensure fair access to all community members for public engagement activities? How can we design our planning processes to reach the broadest demographic?
Dave Biggs
Blog post
September 13, 2015, 1pm PDT
Bike sharing and rental systems are becoming more inclusive, considering the needs of those with disabilities and children. And systems are expanding based different uses people have for different types of bicycles.
Jennifer Evans-Cowley
August 4, 2015, 6am PDT
An op-ed calls for an end to five examples of them planning status quo, and recommends four new "rule of thumbs" that can provide a better model for the transportation planning of the future.
City Observatory City Commentary
July 15, 2015, 8am PDT
The Urban Accessibility Explorer is an easy-to-use mapping system that measures the number of activities that can be reached by residents of specified neighborhoods within a given amount of travel time, by a particular mode and time of day.
Metropolitan Chicago Accessibility Explorer
Blog post
May 4, 2015, 8am PDT
Housing policy is not just about houses, it is also about people, and the determination of who may live in a community. We challenge communities to proclaim, “Yes in our backyard! We welcome new neighbors. We favor more diversity.”
Todd Litman
September 13, 2014, 7am PDT
In a recent piece, Kristine Johnston reviews Washington D.C.'s Capital Bikeshare program and its accessibility for low-income, non-white populations.
Georgetown Public Policy Review
February 11, 2014, 12pm PST
A newly released series of animated GIFs provides a powerful visualization of how paltry even the most robust transit systems in the world look to those with special needs.
Mappable
January 28, 2014, 1pm PST
In a move to increase speed, the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) is looking to cut some stops from its streetcar and bus routes, rousing debate over whether less is really more - particularly in consideration of elderly and disabled riders.
The Toronto Star
September 17, 2013, 5am PDT
Vienna's two-decade-old quest to better balance access to city resources for men and women - called gender mainstreaming - has resulted in more than sixty pilot projects that are reshaping the Austrian capital.
The Atlantic Cities
July 25, 2013, 5am PDT
London-based Transport for All bemoans the inaccessibility of our urban environs for older residents. In this article, they ask designer Neil Chambers how he would design a city to 'facilitate an active and flexible lifestyle for the elderly.'
Bettery Magazine
Blog post
March 6, 2013, 10pm PST
The "Urban Mobility Report" produces widely-cited congestion cost estimates. It is biased in various ways that exaggerate congestion costs and roadway expansion benefits. Few users of these cost estimates seem aware of these problems.
Todd Litman
January 18, 2013, 1pm PST
In a short film for The New York Times, Jason DaSilva documents how New York's famed public transit system, which serves millions of riders every day, fails the city's disabled residents.
The New York Times
December 26, 2012, 11am PST
The increased proximity provided by more compact and centralized development is about ten times more influential than vehicle traffic speed on the number of destinations that people can reach within a given travel time.
Journal Of The American Planning Association
October 24, 2012, 9am PDT
With the portion of American's living in cities set to rise to 90 percent by 2050, a new set of accessibility issues will confront the nation's disabled and aging. Metropolis invited 7 teams of designers to develop solutions to meet this challenge.
Metropolis
Blog post
September 13, 2012, 5am PDT

Conventional planning tends to consider traffic congestion a significant cost and roadway expansion the preferred solution. It evaluates transport system performance based on indicators such as roadway Level of Service (LOS) and peak-period traffic speeds, and dedicates most transportation resources (road space and money) to roads and parking facilities. This results in predict and provide planning in which roadways are expanded to accommodate anticipated traffic, which creates a self-fulfilling prophecy by inducing additional vehicle use.

Todd Litman
September 5, 2012, 10am PDT
It's not just the Sun Cities of America that are planning for how to meet the needs of the country's coming bulge in its over-65 population. Ryan Holeywell highlights how some cities are adapting their built environments for an aging population.
Governing
Blog post
June 3, 2012, 8pm PDT

Congratulations to this year's high school, college and university graduates! The current crop includes our son, who was recruited by a major corporation. The location of his new job will affect his travel patterns and therefore the transportation costs he bears and imposes for the next few years: until now he could get around fine by walking, cycling and public transport, but his new worksite is outside the city center, difficult to access except by automobile. As a result he will spend a significant portion of his new income to purchase and operate a car, and contribute to traffic congestion, parking costs and pollution. This is an example of how land use decisions, such as where corporations locate their offices, affects regional transport patterns and costs.

Todd Litman
November 8, 2011, 9am PST
The Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art opens next Friday in Bentonville, Arkansas, and Holly Finn says "sophisticates" who gripe that the collection should be less remote and more accessible are elitist.
The Wall St. Journal
June 22, 2011, 10am PDT
The La Independencia neighborhood in Medellin, Colombia sprawls up a hillside, leaving the inhabitants to walk up to 10 flights of stairs every day. An ambitious development program is considering building an outdoor network of escalators.
TheCityFix.com