Health

A new study offers evidence that walking in a natural setting is more beneficial to mental health than walking in an urban setting.
Jul 24, 2015   New York Times
The built environment plays a big role in public health, and the professions involved in creating the built environment need to pay more attention to building healthy places, argues Clark Manus, president of the American Institute of Architects.
Apr 22, 2011   Architect
Who's the happiest and healthiest of them all? The New York Times posts an interactive map of the national Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index.
Mar 16, 2011   New York Times
The rural Midwest produces much of our nation's food supply, and yet small towns in the heartland and around America are increasingly and ironically becoming food deserts - places where citizens have little access to fresh, healthy foods.
Jan 25, 2011   Grist
A study of tree cover and pregnant women suggests that women living in areas with more trees are less likely to give birth to undersized babies.
Jan 11, 2011   The Oregonian
Unclean and unsafe water is an increasingly vexing problem for the world's cities, which are struggling to meet the needs of rapidly growing populations. But there has been some positive work in developing countries.
Sep 12, 2010   Citiwire
The U.S. Green Building Council's LEED building rating system has helped grow the ranks of green buildings, but some say it ignores the human health impact of those buildings.
Aug 17, 2010   Yale Environment 360
Blog Post
Apr 15, 2010   By Todd Litman
AARP takes a comprehensive looks at streetcars, exploring their past demise, comeback, and now spreading to as many as 40 cities. Special attention is given to the Portland Streetcar and how the streetcar enables better mobility for seniors.
Apr 6, 2010   AARP Bulletin Today
This piece from <em>Next American City</em> looks at health in New York City, and why the city's new health commissioner is looking at elevators, escalators and other subtleties of the built environment.
Feb 1, 2010   Next American City
A new report from the Health Effect Institute concludes that there is a strong correlation between exposure to traffic and heart ailments.
Jan 15, 2010   The New York Times