Walk Score

May 4, 2016, 9am PDT
It's almost as if every city not named New York is competing for second place when Walk Score releases its annual ranking of most walkable cities. Of course, the top ten is quite an accomplishment: so welcome to the club, Long Beach, California.
Redfin
August 5, 2015, 12pm PDT
Rising rents and competition with chains are taking their toll on Manhattan bodegas, a mainstay for hispanic neighborhoods for their fresh and ethnic foods. As their numbers decline, chain stores increase, and Walk Scores drop.
The New York Times N.Y. / Region
May 17, 2015, 1pm PDT
Walk Score released an updated ranking of the best cities for biking—including Bike Scores for a total of 154 U.S. cities—in time for Bike to Work Week and National Bike Month.
Redfin
April 9, 2015, 11am PDT
The newest rankings of the most walkable cities in the United States, courtesy of Walk Score, contains a few surprises along with its standard annual recognition of New York City.
CityLab
April 2, 2014, 5am PDT
Walk Score’s new food desert map is a potentially powerful tool in the ongoing policy debate about access to healthy foods. But it’s still a work in progress.
Next City
January 31, 2014, 7am PST
Walk Score has published its analysis of the quality of public transit in 50 of the biggest cities in the United States. The rankings may surprise you.
Fast Company Co.Exist
November 7, 2013, 6am PST
Walk Score has released its 2014 ranking of Most Walkable U.S. Cities and Neighborhoods. Though New York's position at the top of the list would be easy to explain, one surprise made the top five.
Walk Score
August 24, 2013, 9am PDT
Watch out Walk Score, you've got some competition. Mapping company Maponics is measuring pedestrian-friendliness with a new tool called 'Walkability'. They measure several factors Walk Score doesn't, including crime, street type, and speed limit.
Fast Company Co.Exist
July 25, 2013, 8am PDT
Planning professor Doug Kelbaugh lives in one of the few neighborhoods outside Manhattan with a perfect 100 Walk Score. His brother's house in South Carolina has a Walk Score of 1. Kelbaugh reflects on the extremes, and what they mean.
Congress for the New Urbanism
December 20, 2012, 2pm PST
This week, the website Walk Score announced the results of its expanded Bike Score evaluation. With more than double the amount of cities than initially ranked, the usual favorites (Minneapolis, Portland), were joined by some surprises.
The Atlantic Cities
September 12, 2012, 10am PDT
Going beyond the analytical parameters of the popular Walk Score website, a new site aims to broaden the scope of analysis to include more qualitative information, such as safety and streetscape, in determining which areas are pedestrian friendly.
Fast Company Co.Exist
May 15, 2012, 11am PDT
The folks behind Walk Score, the incredibly popular walkability measure, are beta testing a new metric that judges the bikeability of cities, writes Jess Zimmerman.
Grist
April 26, 2012, 12pm PDT
Real estate's favorite tool for gauging neighborhood walkability now has a companion for transit, Kaid Benfield reports.
Switchboard
April 18, 2012, 7am PDT
Will Oremus investigates an occurrence he noticed recently in Tom Vanderbilt's series on walking – that the cities with the highest "walk scores" were all liberal – and asks why conservative cities don't walk.
Slate
April 14, 2012, 11am PDT
For the third installment of his series on America's pedestrian problem, Tom Vanderbilt profiles Walk Score, the venerable walkability website and evaluation system.
Slate
March 23, 2012, 2pm PDT
This weekend, the Final Four of the NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament will be decided on courts in cities across the country. Earlier this week, however, Kaid Benfield crowned his own champion - based on walkability.
Switchboard
Feature
December 6, 2010, 10am PST
New neighborhood-level data from the walkability rating website Walk Score has broadened the view of what it means to live in a walkable city.
Nate Berg
October 24, 2010, 11am PDT
The shortcomings of Walk Score are becoming more apparent as planners look to use it as a measure of walkability, says The Conservative Planner.
Conservative Planner
March 27, 2009, 10am PDT
Eric A. Morris takes a look at pedestrian-oriented cities with an economist's eyes.
Freakonomics - NY Times Blog